TRAVEL ALERT! Important information about the Coronavirus situation in Oman

3 Day Culture Itinerary

Home > Trip Planner > 3 Day Culture Trip

Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

Day 1

Sur

Located less than two hours from Muscat, Sur is a great place to visit thanks to its rich cultural heritage. Sur is home to the last remaining Dhow yard in Oman, where visitors have the unique chance to witness how traditional Dhows are made by hand. Close to the Dhow factory, the Sur Maritime Museum focusses on the city’s maritime history as trading and Dhow building centre. Travelling in the direction of the lagoon, visitors can see Al Ayjah and its lighthouse overlooking the sea.

Bait Al Baranda

historical displays from across the ages

Bait Al Baranda is located in Muttrah in what used to be the residence of a prominent merchant in the early 20th century. Exhibits include art and historical displays from across the ages.

Converted from a 1930s house, this museum details the history of Oman and the Muscat region. Covering topics from the geology of the country and plate tectonics to Oman’s military and political history, a visit to Bait Al-Baranda (translates to ‘villa with a verandah’) is a great way to get an overview of Omani culture and tradition. Multimedia exhibits include interactive screens and videos as well as a photo history and a variety of art and posters on display. There are models of and artifacts from ancient Oman. Tracing history back to prehistoric Oman, the exhibits tells of the country’s early Islamic period, Portuguese occupation and current dynasty. A presentation of dinosaurs’ bones found 10,000 years ago in the Al-Khoud area is particularly noteworthy.
Read MoreRead Less
Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque

An architectural masterpiece

This architectural masterpiece is Oman's pride and joy. Located in Bawshar, the mosque is home to the world’s second largest hand-woven carpet as well as a one of the largest chandeliers in the world which is decorated with hundreds of Swarovski crystals. The mosque is open to the public from Saturday to Thursday between 8am and 11am and a dress code applies.

Quietly imposing from the outside, this glorious piece of modern Islamic architecture was a gift to the nation from Sultan Qaboos to mark his 30th year of reign. The main prayer hall is breathtakingly beautiful. The Persian carpet alone measures 70m by 60m wide, making it the second-largest hand-loomed Iranian carpet in the world; it took 600 women four years to weave. Mwasalat buses stop outside the mosque. The mosque, which can accommodate 20,000 worshippers, including 750 women in a private musalla (prayer hall), is an active place of worship, particularly for Friday prayers. Visitors are required to dress modestly, covering arms and legs and avoiding tight clothing. Women and girls (aged seven and above) must cover their hair. An abaya (full-length dress) and scarf can be hired from the mosque cafe and gift shop for OR2.5; some form of ID is required as a deposit. Tours are available.
Read MoreRead Less
Muttrah Souq and Fish Market

Highlights of this historic waterfront

Located close to each other along Muttrah’s scenic corniche, Muttrah Souq and Fish Market are the highlights of this historic waterfront. Early each morning, local fishermen sell their fresh catch at the fish market and Muttrah Souq is the perfect place to barter for traditional silver jewellery, Frankincense, fabrics and many more unique souvenirs.

Read MoreRead Less
Oil and Gas Exhibition Centre

Learn about the oil and gas industry

The Oman Oil and Gas Exhibition Centre highlights the journey of the discovery, extraction, and use of fossil fuels in Oman through interactive displays.

Established in 1995 under Petroleum Development Oman (PDO), the centre particularly appeals to visitors interested in learning about the oil and gas industry and how it has contributed to the growth of infrastructure throughout Oman.

The PDO planetarium lies adjacent to the centre and boasts a “full dome” digital system to teach kids and adults about astronomy in an engaging way.

Read MoreRead Less

Day 2

Sharqiyah Sands

Head towards Sharqiyah Sands and the town of Bidiyah, which is a great place to start a desert excursion. Local tour operators offer day-long excursion into the desert by 4WD vehicle or camel. Truly an unforgettable experience.

Sharqiyah Sands

experience the desert first hand

The Sharqiyah Sands allows visitors to experience the desert first hand, with dunes reaching as far as the horizon and the area teeming with wildlife. Dune bashing is one of the many favourite activities for visitors to the Sharqiyah Sands.

Read MoreRead Less
Wadi Bani Khalid

One of the Sultanate’s best-known wadis

One of the Sultanate’s best known wadis, Wadi Bani Khalid is a geographical wonderland of pools, caves and mountains. Unlike other wadis, it enjoys a constant flow of water all year round - perfect for visiting any season.

Read MoreRead Less
Wadi Tiwi

best explored on foot

Not far from Wadi Shab is Wadi Tiwi, which is lined by small villages and date and banana plantations. Although the wadi can be accessed by car, it is best explored on foot, with a two-day hike possible across the mountains to Wadi Bani Khalid.

A couple of kilometres south of Wadi Shab lies the almost identical Wadi Tiwi, another spectacularly deep and narrow gorge carved out of the mountains, running between towering cliffs right down to the sea. It’s less unspoiled than Wadi Shab surrounded by lush plantations of date and banana, and criss-crossed with a network of gurgling aflaj.
Read MoreRead Less
Sinaw Camel Market

A bustling souq

Fridays is camel market at Sinaw Souq, located at the edge of the Sharqiyah Sands and just a two hour drive from Muscat. This bustling souq is mainly visited by Bedouins, who come from the entire region to buy and sell live stock and everyday items.

Sinaw Thursday Market is held every Thursday in A’Sharqiyah North Governorate. It is a very busy market due to its proximity to the Bedouin communities, who head there to buy staples and sell their livestock and handicrafts. This market runs from six in the morning until one in the afternoon.
Read MoreRead Less

Day 3

Nizwa

Home to Nizwa Fort and Souq – both of which are attractions in their own right. With its massive circular watchtower and interior living spaces, this is a great example of an Omani fortification. The fort is surrounded by a sprawling souq, where visitors can spend hours bargaining for local pottery, handicrafts and jewellery. The wadi and village of Tanuf is a 20-minute drive away from Nizwa Fort. Here you can explore old ruins and walk along the river before setting out for your return to Muscat.

Falaj Daris and Al Khataman

A UNESCO World Heritage Site

Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006, these aflaj - irrigations systems – were constructed as far back as 500 AD and are still in use today. Both falaj use gravity to irrigate the surrounding fields with water from underground springs.

The Falaj Daris is the biggest falaj in Oman, and one of the five collectively listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2006. Nizwa’s former prosperity was due to its plethora of water supplies, with over 134 aflaj (plural for falaj) in the Nizwa wilayat (village). One hundred of these are still in use today.
Read MoreRead Less
Al Khabourah Castle

explore the former living and storage quarters

Facing the sea, Al Khabourah Castle is located 2km north east from the Al Khabourah roundabout. Visitors can explore the former living and storage quarters left and right of the large courtyard, or enjoy the stunning views of the sea and surroundings from the castle walls.

The Al Khabourah Castle, one of the top tourist destinations in the Sultanate, is ready to receive visitors again. The restoration and rehabilitation of the castle, located little less than 2 km from the main centre of Suhar and close to the Sea of Oman, has been completed under the care of Ministry of Heritage and Culture. The renovation has included restoration of a collapsed wall, apart from the maintenance of the castle’s rooms, entrances and towers, and electrification and other public facilities. Naturally available materials such as mud and stones have been used for restoration aimed at preserving the fort for posterity and positioning it as a tourist destination. The Al Khabourah Castle was earlier restored in 1994. The restoration work included cleaning inside and around the castle, transporting debris and removing the collapsed buildings and roofs. It also included strengthening the foundation of the monument from inside and outside, peeling off the concrete plaster from walls inside and outside and retaining old plaster to preserve its archaeological character. The restoration also included building walls of the same dimension as earlier using gravel and mud, and rebuilding the roof using canadel, bamboo and mirenth wood. It also included provision of electrical connections both outside and inside, and paving the inner squares of the castle with stones. Doors and windows bear exact resemblance to the original ones. According to Amer al Balushi from the ministry, Al Khabourah Castle was a “legal court and not a war site” as some people think. The castle has a courtyard at the centre. The main entrance is located on the northern side, with two artillery shells beside it.
Read MoreRead Less
Wadi Mayh

A unique Omani geological site

Wadi Mayh is recognised as a unique Omani geological site, due to its lime stone cliffs and interesting rock formations. The wadi features numerous date palm plantations and irrigation channels as well as water pools where visitors can take a dip and cool off.

Wadi Mayh is a long valley that lies between Yiti and Sifah, along the highway to Quriyat. In the western part of the valley,  an enormous mountain range that appears to have been naturally engraved with many layers created during different geological periods. Now, it looks like a massive display of rock art. This picturesque landscape is dotted with small streams and pools of fresh water, which are an intense turquoise blue in colour. Two villages are conveniently situated on the edge of the wadi in the middle of the valley.
Read MoreRead Less
Misfat Al Abryeen

A real insight into village life

A traditional village nestled into the side of the mountain, Misfat Al Abryeen can be reached by car from Al Hamra. Here, visitors can take a walk through the terraced farms and pass mudbrick buildings to enjoy a real insight into village life.

The mountain village of Misfat Al Abriyeen is a maze of alleys surrounded by traditional buildings, often tall mud structures built into and around Jebel Akhdar.
Read MoreRead Less
  • 1 Day
  • 3 Days
  • 7 Days
  • 12 Days
  • - 1 Day

    1 Day

    One day may not feel long to experience everything Oman has to offer but with some careful planning and clever selections you can certainly make the most of every minute.

  • - 3 Days

    3 Days

    Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

  • - 7 Days

    7 Days

    If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

  • - 12 Days

    12 Days

    A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.