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12 Day Family Itinerary

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A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.

Day 1

Salalah

Best visited during Khareef season, the Summer months of monsoon when the mountains take on a beautiful hue of green, Salalah and its surrounding is a haven for nature lovers. The starting point of this trip is a trip to explore its amazing marine life. The Hallaniyat Islands are home to many dolphins, whales, coral, and other marine life. There are also several wrecks in the area, including the famous Vasco Da Gama wreck, the Esmerelda.

Mirbat

once the capital of Dhofar

East of Salalah, the coastal town of Mirbat was once the capital of Dhofar, trading in frankincense and Arabian horses. Today, visitors can spot dhows heading out to fish, or explore the old merchant houses near Mirbat Fort.

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Falaj Daris and Al Khataman

A UNESCO World Heritage Site

Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006, these aflaj - irrigations systems – were constructed as far back as 500 AD and are still in use today. Both falaj use gravity to irrigate the surrounding fields with water from underground springs.

The Falaj Daris is the biggest falaj in Oman, and one of the five collectively listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2006. Nizwa’s former prosperity was due to its plethora of water supplies, with over 134 aflaj (plural for falaj) in the Nizwa wilayat (village). One hundred of these are still in use today.
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Bilad Sayt

In the Hajar Mountains

Widely regarded as one of the most beautiful mountain villages in the Sultanate, Bilad Sayt is nestled within the Hajar Mountains and reachable only by 4WD vehicle from Al Hamra or Wadi Bani Awf. Villagers still practice the traditional terrace farming that has served the community for centuries.

You discover the true essence of Arabia — so mystic, so unimaginable and so magical — when your four-wheel drive leaves the bustling cities, heading towards interiors of the arid desert region. Drive to the mountains and villages on weekends and discover the true Arabia. Here in Muscat the Al Hajar mountain ranges offer plenty of options. Bilad Sayt, a fairy tale like village typical of the Arabian settlements of the past, is one of the most picturesque villages in Oman. The mere view of the village will stop you for minutes in awestruck, a ‘wow’ will slowly and quietly roll out of your mouth as you stand there. The village is seated at the foot of towering and dramatic Hajar mountain ranges that just by 2-2.30pm block the sun from falling on the terraced village. Getting there will take a little work — but it’s worth it as it’s one of the unique places to see in Oman.
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Ibra

A modern city

Once a trading hub at the gates to the Sharqiyah Sands, Ibra today is a modern city complete with university, hospital and hotels. Its many forts and mosques are some of the oldest in Oman, with Al Minzifah and the Wednesday Women’s Market just some of the must-see highlights.

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Day 2 – 3

East of Salalah

East of Salalah are some of Oman’s most interesting attractions, including Wadi Darbat and Mirbat. With its lake and, during the Khareef season, mist-covered hills it is a sight to behold and believed to be one of the most scenic spots in Dhofar. Here, children can go for a small boat ride. Considered to be one the largest solvent sinkholes in the world, Tawi Ateer is a haven for bird watching enthusiasts and those that want to learn more about nature. You’ll soon see how appropriate it is that the name literally translates to The well of birds’. Dhofar’s highest mountain is also home to the Jebel Samhan Nature Reserve, one of the places in the world to find wild Arabian leopards and other larger mammals. Although not open to the public, the plateau before the reserve allows for breath-taking views of the wadis, villages and coast below. Ideal for camping.

Museum of Frankincense Land

Rich in maritime history

The Museum of Frankincense Land in Salalah borders the ruins of Al Baleed Archaeological Park and is dedicated to the trading history of this ancient port. Visitors can discover how trade with Frankincense and maritime strength ensured the region flourished in the 12th century.

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Diving in Salalah

Spectacular Diving Experience

Salalah is a good starting point for diving and snorkelling excursions offered by local tour operators.

Shallow dive sites accessed by 4 wheel drive and fast boat extend from Salalah to Mirbat along a 40 km stretch of the coast. Marine life is typically Indo-Pacific offering a variety of macro life, brain and table corals and schooling fish, having more in common with its far southern neighbours than the Arabian Sea. The water’s colour is more blue and visibility generally higher than the dive sites located around the Muscat and Musandam regions, offering a great contrast in marine conditions if twinned with a stay in Muscat or Musandam. Due to local prevailing conditions, these dive sites are only open to divers seasonally from October to May. It remains a beautiful area to visit outside of this time, but you are not guaranteed to be able to dive every day though the dive centres remain operational. From May, the seasonal monsoon creates a phenomenon called the ‘khareef’, bringing in moisture rich winds turning the beautifully barren desert plateaux and gullies verdant green.
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Jebel Samhan

home to Oman’s Leopard Sanctuary

Dhofar’s highest mountain is also home to Oman’s Leopard Sanctuary, for which special permission to visit is required. However, visitors can explore a host of attractions ranging from the Tawi Ateer Sinkhole to the round houses of the indigenous Jebbali tribe, before setting up camp on the peak’s plateau – just before  the sanctuary’s entrance.

Jebel Samhan is one of the major mountain ranges of Dhofar, whose highest peak reaches 2,100 meters. Jebel Samhan has many levels that are traversed by deep and narrow mountain passes, some of which are up to a thousand feet deep. In the plain of Jebel Samhan different plant species such as acacia and frankincense trees grow. The narrow mountain passes are poor in water, but there are numerous streams that serve as an important source of water for most of the animals living here. (Classified as an endangered species) In addition to the Arabian leopards are many other mammals native to these mountains, including the Arabian Gazelle, the fox and the Nubian goat.
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Hallaniyat Islands

historic shipwrecks that dot the sea bed

Humpback whales and other marine life have made the water surrounding the Hallaniyat Islands home. These, together with several historic shipwrecks that dot the sea bed, provide great opportunities for any diving enthusiasts.

The Hallaniyat Islands offer untouched dive sites, and new ones are being discovered all the time. Tourism in the area is relatively new and the islands are only visited by liveaboard, giving you the chance to be one of the first to explore this untouched area. The reefs are covered with hard and soft corals with colourful residents including plenty of macro life. The seascapes include walls, spur and groove and some overhangs with a lot of fish life. Diving highlights are undoubtedly the opportunity to be in the water with the resident population of humpback whales but may also include encounters with manta rays and other whales. Anything is possible here. The islands boast a healthy marine life and you’ll see huge schools of fish at most dive sites. Huge pods of dolphin are often seen as are honeycomb morays and green turtles. There are also opportunities to explore some wrecks. The diving in the area is exploratory and suited to experienced divers.
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Day 4

West of Salalah

The natural beauty of the region becomes apparent when travelling in the direction of the border with Yemen. From blowholes and caves to secluded beaches, this day is dedicated to the special highlights located west of Dhofar’s capital, Salalah. A favourite family picnic spot, the end of Mughsayl beach holds a special surprise during Khareef. Only then do the blowholes erupt, pushing sea water metres into the air and drenching anyone adventurous enough to stand too close. Wadi Dawkah makes for a great diversion on your way back to Salalah. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, the location is open to the public with special viewing areas providing panoramic views of the five square kilometres area densely populated with Boswellia sacra, more commonly known as Frankincense trees.

Prophet Ayoub’s Grave

a popular attraction

Tucked away on Jebel Ateen, the tomb of Prophet Ayoub (Job) is a popular attraction. The prophet is said to have left a footprint outside the building after being commanded to strike the ground for a spring to appear.

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Hallaniyat Islands

historic shipwrecks that dot the sea bed

Humpback whales and other marine life have made the water surrounding the Hallaniyat Islands home. These, together with several historic shipwrecks that dot the sea bed, provide great opportunities for any diving enthusiasts.

The Hallaniyat Islands offer untouched dive sites, and new ones are being discovered all the time. Tourism in the area is relatively new and the islands are only visited by liveaboard, giving you the chance to be one of the first to explore this untouched area. The reefs are covered with hard and soft corals with colourful residents including plenty of macro life. The seascapes include walls, spur and groove and some overhangs with a lot of fish life. Diving highlights are undoubtedly the opportunity to be in the water with the resident population of humpback whales but may also include encounters with manta rays and other whales. Anything is possible here. The islands boast a healthy marine life and you’ll see huge schools of fish at most dive sites. Huge pods of dolphin are often seen as are honeycomb morays and green turtles. There are also opportunities to explore some wrecks. The diving in the area is exploratory and suited to experienced divers.
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Anti-Gravity Point – Mirbat

Anti-Gravity Point

Not far from Mirbat, people from all around the world come to this Anti-Gravity Point to experience the out-of-this-world feeling of having their car seemingly move up-hill with no driver input or power.

Many people come to Salalah Anit Gravity Point to see their cars going up the hill at Neutral gear (without any acceleration). This is a really amazing experience and a unique one. The car can move at a speed of more than 40 to 60 kilometers per hour without any acceleration. This point is near Tawi Atair / Mirbat and you can visit this place while going to Mirbat. You can also plan to go to this place after visiting Wadi Darbat and driving for aproximately 20 to 30 minutes on the Eastern side.
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Jebel Samhan Nature Reserve

See wild Arabian Leopards

A special permission is required to visit the Jebel Samham Nature Reserve, which is home to some of the last wild Arabian Leopards and other rare species such as the Arabian Wolf and Striped Hyena. The road leading to the reserve, however, is rewarding on its own right, passing large baobab trees and traditional Jeballi settlements to Jebel Samham’s breath-taking escarpment.

Jabal Samhan Nature Reserve is a nature reserve in the area of Jabal Samḥān (Arabic: جَـبَـل سَـمْـحَـان‎, "Mount Samhan") in Dhofar. It has an area of 4,500 square kilometres (1,700 sq mi) and has no permanent population. Being in the region of the Dhofar Mountains, it is one of the last refuges for wild Arabian leopards. The most important prey species are Arabian gazelle, Nubian ibex, Cape hare, rock hyrax, Indian crested porcupine, desert hedgehog and several bird species.
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Day 5 – 6

Musandam

Easily reached by flight via Muscat, the Musandam Peninsula, an exclave of Oman surrounded by the UAE, enjoys a breath-taking location facing the Strait of Hormuz and Sea of Oman. Musandam has many scenic bays and fjords that can be discovered by boat or Dhow cruise. Dolphins often frequent the waters and so does plenty of other colourful marine life. Jebel Hareem is Musandam’s highest point and what better way to explore it than by mountain bike. Local tour operators can arrange pick up or drop off whenever and wherever required.

Village of Kumzar

requires special permission to visit

Nestled in an isolated bay close to the Strait of Hormuz, this village is only accessible by boat. Locals speak their own language known as Kumzari but, given its remote location, the village is surprisingly modern.

One of the most inaccessible settlements in Oman, the famously remote town of KUMZAR sits perched in solitary splendour at the northernmost edge of Musandam, hemmed in by sheer mountains and accessible only by boat. A “visit” to the town therefore involves sitting in your boat in the harbour about 100m offshore and seeing what you can, although it’s still well worth making the trip out here for the magnificent coastal scenery en route, as well as for the tantalizing glimpse of Oman’s most reclusive town at the end of it. Many of Musandam’s best diving spots are also located in the waters around Kumzar for more details. The town overlooks the Straits of Hormuz, one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes, a fact reflected in the unique language spoken by its inhabitants, Kumzari. The village is said to be around seven hundred years old, its inhabitants including a hotchpotch of ethnic groups ranging from Yemeni to Zanzibari – the colourful theory that sailors shipwrecked off the nearby coast were also integrated into the population is backed up by the remarkable number of European and Hindi loan words found in Kumzari. The town’s population currently stands at around five thousand, with its own school, hospital, power station and desalination plant. The inhabitants live largely by fishing for nine months of the year, netting barracuda, tuna, kingfish and hammour .
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Village of Lima

famous for its local handicrafts

Surrounded by mountains and accessible by boat, the village of Lima is famous for its local handicrafts - especially the Al Jarz, a small traditional axe. The boat trip itself will take you through stunning marine vistas where you can see unique rock formations.

This is a small village separated from Wilayt Khasab in Musandam Governorate by rugged mountainous peaks. That’s why the best way to reach this village is by boats that will take you through marine vistas that will be engraved in your memory for ever. There visitors will enjoy the fantastic rock formations of the mountain range directly overlooking the sea, and birds hovering over the sapphire waters through the distance that separates Khasab from Lima. The village is known for its local crafts specially the unique AlJarz.
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Dhow Cruises

a great way to experience Musandam’s coastline

Dhow cruises are a great way to experience Musandam’s coastline in the traditional sense. Many marinas and tour operators provide dhow cruises that can include island visits, swimming, barbecues, and more.

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Snorkelling

a memorable experience

Thanks to its clear waters teeming with exotic marine life and coral formations, snorkelling in Musandam is always a memorable experience. Lima Rock is especially renowned for the variety of fish, rays and other creatures, as well as the many caves and fissures available to explore.

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Day 7

Salmah Plateau

The easiest route to the plateau is to fly into Muscat, following which you can rent a 4WD vehicle to reach the plateau, which is about 120km from Muscat. The plateau itself offers some stunning attractions worth visiting, including Majlis Al Jinn, one of the largest underground caves in the world, the Majlis Al Jinn, is a special undertaking. Prior permission is required from the Ministry of Tourism and the help of a guide is mandatory. If travelling with smaller children, you might wish to opt for a visit to the beehive tombs of Al Jaylan instead, before setting up camp on the plateau.

Omani French Museum

Established by His Majesty, Sultan Qaboos bin Said

Honouring the close relationship Oman and France have enjoyed for centuries, the Omani French Museum was established by His Majesty, Sultan Qaboos bin Said and former French President, the late François Mitterrand in 1992. It is housed in Bait Faransa, the former residence of a French consul in Old Muscat.

With galleries detailing relations between the two countries, this museum provides an interesting snapshot of mostly 19th-century colonial life in Muscat. Of particular interest are a series of old photographs and maps documenting the capital in the last century. There's also a Paris map showing the itinerary of His Majesty Sultan Qaboos during his state visit in 1989.
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Bird Watching in Quriyat

a favourite with bird watchers

The fishing village of Quriyat, en route to Sur, is a favourite with bird watchers. Species such as kingfishers and grey herons are known to frequent the surrounding lagoons.

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Bait Al Baranda

historical displays from across the ages

Bait Al Baranda is located in Muttrah in what used to be the residence of a prominent merchant in the early 20th century. Exhibits include art and historical displays from across the ages.

Converted from a 1930s house, this museum details the history of Oman and the Muscat region. Covering topics from the geology of the country and plate tectonics to Oman’s military and political history, a visit to Bait Al-Baranda (translates to ‘villa with a verandah’) is a great way to get an overview of Omani culture and tradition. Multimedia exhibits include interactive screens and videos as well as a photo history and a variety of art and posters on display. There are models of and artifacts from ancient Oman. Tracing history back to prehistoric Oman, the exhibits tells of the country’s early Islamic period, Portuguese occupation and current dynasty. A presentation of dinosaurs’ bones found 10,000 years ago in the Al-Khoud area is particularly noteworthy.
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Wadi Mayh

A unique Omani geological site

Wadi Mayh is recognised as a unique Omani geological site, due to its lime stone cliffs and interesting rock formations. The wadi features numerous date palm plantations and irrigation channels as well as water pools where visitors can take a dip and cool off.

Wadi Mayh is a long valley that lies between Yiti and Sifah, along the highway to Quriyat. In the western part of the valley,  an enormous mountain range that appears to have been naturally engraved with many layers created during different geological periods. Now, it looks like a massive display of rock art. This picturesque landscape is dotted with small streams and pools of fresh water, which are an intense turquoise blue in colour. Two villages are conveniently situated on the edge of the wadi in the middle of the valley.
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Day 8 – 9

Wadi Bani Khalid & A’Sharqiyah Sands

A short drive away, Wadi Bani Khalid is one of the most photographed attractions in Oman. While an entire day can easily be spent here, simply enjoying the sheer beauty of the wadi and its water pools, a trek from here to Wadi Tiwi across the mountain range is a unique experience and one that must only be undertaken with a guide. With smaller children it is recommended to spend the day at Wadi Bani Khalid before heading to one of the many desert camps in the Sharqiyah Sands for one or more unforgettable overnights for the family.

Al Ashkharah

The spectacular sandy beaches surround Al Ashkharah on both sides and extend for several kilometers, it is embraced by Arabian Sea, and there are many umbrellas on the beach that allow tourists to enjoy seeing the beauty of the beach and its golden sands, it is also a place for flocks of Gull and wader.

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Al Saleel National Park

It is located to the north of Al Kamil W’al Wafi Wilayat and 57 km from Sur. It consists of three basic geographical types.

The first is the alluvial plain and has a wide yard of acacia and gum Arabic trees, the second is the valleys that split the mountains and the third is the broad hills of these mountains.

This Park is home to the Arabian gazelle, wild cats, Arabian wolves, red fox and Egyptian eagle, along with a variety of turtles and birds.

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Jalan Bani Bu Ali

A town steeped in history with old watchtowers

Jalan Bani Bu Ali is a town steeped in history with old watchtowers, an old fort and ornate carved wooden doors at every turn. However, it is most famous for the souq, which is open every Friday morning and sells a variety of modern and traditional goods.

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Wadi Tiwi

best explored on foot

Not far from Wadi Shab is Wadi Tiwi, which is lined by small villages and date and banana plantations. Although the wadi can be accessed by car, it is best explored on foot, with a two-day hike possible across the mountains to Wadi Bani Khalid.

A couple of kilometres south of Wadi Shab lies the almost identical Wadi Tiwi, another spectacularly deep and narrow gorge carved out of the mountains, running between towering cliffs right down to the sea. It’s less unspoiled than Wadi Shab surrounded by lush plantations of date and banana, and criss-crossed with a network of gurgling aflaj.
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Day 10

Turtle watching

The turtle reserve at Ras Al Jinz offers a unique glimpse into the life of turtles, and how for decades they return to the same beach to lay their eggs. A coastal city with colourful past, Sur once was an important trading hub, thanks to its natural harbour and strategic location. At the last remaining Dhow yard, one can witness how Dhows are built by hand – without plans. A true engineering marvel and interesting for the entire family. Green turtles are endangered, so the rangers at the Ras Al Jinz nature reserve take special care not to disturb the animals when showing visitors around – this includes mothers laying eggs at night and hatchlings making their way to the ocean at sunrise.

Ain Al Thawarah Hot Springs

Enjoy the therapeutic properties of the mineral water

Close to the Nakhal Fort, along a winding road framed by palm trees as far as the eye can see, are the Ain Al Thawarah hot springs. To this day, locals use the springs as a trusted water supply, and there is even a small pool to enjoy the therapeutic properties of the mineral water.

Beyond the date plantations that surround Nakhal Fort, this hot spring emerges from the wadi walls and is directed into a falaj (immigration channel) for the irrigation of the surrounding plantations. There are usually children and goats splashing in the overspill. Look out for the flash of turquoise-winged Indian rollers, among other birds, attracted to the oasis. Picnic tables with shelters, a store and toilets make it popular at weekends.
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Pink Lagoons of Al Kahil

A striking bright pink

Found in the central part of Al Wusta, the pink lagoons of Al Kahil and Al Jazir derive their name from the colour the lagoons take on when algae change the appearance of the water and turn the surrounding sand a striking bright pink.

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Omani French Museum

Established by His Majesty, Sultan Qaboos bin Said

Honouring the close relationship Oman and France have enjoyed for centuries, the Omani French Museum was established by His Majesty, Sultan Qaboos bin Said and former French President, the late François Mitterrand in 1992. It is housed in Bait Faransa, the former residence of a French consul in Old Muscat.

With galleries detailing relations between the two countries, this museum provides an interesting snapshot of mostly 19th-century colonial life in Muscat. Of particular interest are a series of old photographs and maps documenting the capital in the last century. There's also a Paris map showing the itinerary of His Majesty Sultan Qaboos during his state visit in 1989.
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Khawr Najd

Oman’s most scenic fjords

Picture-perfect Khawr Najd is one of Oman’s most scenic fjords, accessible via a road surrounded by high cliffs and leading to crystal clear waters below.

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Day 11

Tiwi

Located between Sur and Muscat, the white pebble and sand beaches of Bimmah, Fins, and Tiwi are an incredible sight. The roads approaching Wadi Tiwi are twisty and narrow, and the perfect excuse to park the car and explore the area on foot. Villages along the route are surrounded by date palms and still use falaj, the traditional methods of irrigation. Close t o Wadi Tiwi is Wadi Shab, which can only be reached by boat or by wading across during low tide. Natural water pools, a waterfall and hidden cave await those entering the wadi. Bring your swimming gear and enjoy.

Daymaniyat Islands

Snorkelling and Diving

Located off the coast between Barka and Al Seeb, the Daymaniyat Islands are surrounded by turquoise waters that are perfect for snorkelling and diving. The islands are a protected area, home to endangered sea turtles, untouched coral reefs, and exotic fish.

The main tourist draw between Barka and Sohar is the Sawadi and Daymaniyat islands (and the adjacent Al Sawadi Beach Resort), one of the country’s leading dive spots, but equally rewarding to visit for a snorkel or swim. The rocky and windswept Sawadi Islands lie just offshore. The largest of the seven islands lies almost within spitting distance of the beach, a large rocky hump topped by a string of watchtowers, while the other smaller islands lie further out to sea. It’s possible to walk across the sand to the main island at low tide, though take care you don’t get stranded when the tide comes back in; at other times boat trips can be arranged by bargaining with the local fishermen on the beach for around 5 OR, while snorkelling trips can be set up through Extra Divers at the Al Sawadi Beach Resort. The beach here is littered with exotic-looking seashells, perfect for a stroll and a spot of beachcombing.
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Hallaniyat Islands

historic shipwrecks that dot the sea bed

Humpback whales and other marine life have made the water surrounding the Hallaniyat Islands home. These, together with several historic shipwrecks that dot the sea bed, provide great opportunities for any diving enthusiasts.

The Hallaniyat Islands offer untouched dive sites, and new ones are being discovered all the time. Tourism in the area is relatively new and the islands are only visited by liveaboard, giving you the chance to be one of the first to explore this untouched area. The reefs are covered with hard and soft corals with colourful residents including plenty of macro life. The seascapes include walls, spur and groove and some overhangs with a lot of fish life. Diving highlights are undoubtedly the opportunity to be in the water with the resident population of humpback whales but may also include encounters with manta rays and other whales. Anything is possible here. The islands boast a healthy marine life and you’ll see huge schools of fish at most dive sites. Huge pods of dolphin are often seen as are honeycomb morays and green turtles. There are also opportunities to explore some wrecks. The diving in the area is exploratory and suited to experienced divers.
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Khawr Najd

Oman’s most scenic fjords

Picture-perfect Khawr Najd is one of Oman’s most scenic fjords, accessible via a road surrounded by high cliffs and leading to crystal clear waters below.

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Wadi Bani Habib
One of the famous wadis in Al Jebel Al Akhdar, this Wadi can be explored on foot. It is surrounded on all sides with green walnut groves and some local bushes widely scattered. It also the home to the abandoned village of Bani Habib, which welcomes visitors who are trekking and exploration lovers.
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Day 12

Muscat

Oman’s capital is always worth a visit. After days on the road, it is the perfect place to end the perfect holiday. Located at the Ministry of Heritage & Culture, the Natural History Museum offers interesting insights into Oman’s natural history, from its geology to its flora and fauna. The skeleton of a washed ashore sperm whale is displayed, providing a unique glimpse at one of the largest mammals in the world. One of the many city beaches, Al Qurum Beach is great for long walks or simply watching local footballers play against each other – or joining in. A perfect way to end the trip.

Oman Natural History Museum

Located at the Ministry of Heritage and Culture

The Oman Natural History Museum provides a fascinating insight into the geological heritage of the Sultanate and its impressive flora and fauna, with displays of mammals, insects and birds as well as a beautiful botanical garden outside.

Highlights include the Whale Room, which features the large skeleton of a sperm whale which washed up on Oman’s shores in the 1980s. Natural History Museum of Oman was opened on 30 December 1985,  . The Museum shows the Omani environment diversity through offers of terrain, geology, plants, insects, wild animals and marine life. Despite the small size of the Museum but abounding of facts dealing with biodiversity of the Sultanate of Oman. The Museum features stuffed animals rarely found in the wilds of types and species living in the land of Oman, skeletons of marine organisms, birds and reptiles lived in Omani environment.
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Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque

An architectural masterpiece

This architectural masterpiece is Oman's pride and joy. Located in Bawshar, the mosque is home to the world’s second largest hand-woven carpet as well as a one of the largest chandeliers in the world which is decorated with hundreds of Swarovski crystals. The mosque is open to the public from Saturday to Thursday between 8am and 11am and a dress code applies.

Quietly imposing from the outside, this glorious piece of modern Islamic architecture was a gift to the nation from Sultan Qaboos to mark his 30th year of reign. The main prayer hall is breathtakingly beautiful. The Persian carpet alone measures 70m by 60m wide, making it the second-largest hand-loomed Iranian carpet in the world; it took 600 women four years to weave. Mwasalat buses stop outside the mosque. The mosque, which can accommodate 20,000 worshippers, including 750 women in a private musalla (prayer hall), is an active place of worship, particularly for Friday prayers. Visitors are required to dress modestly, covering arms and legs and avoiding tight clothing. Women and girls (aged seven and above) must cover their hair. An abaya (full-length dress) and scarf can be hired from the mosque cafe and gift shop for OR2.5; some form of ID is required as a deposit. Tours are available.
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Oman Children’s Museum

a scientific museum

Set in two distinctive domes in the north of Qurum, the Oman Children’s Museum is a scientific museum that delves into biology, interesting optical illusions, and other interactive displays for children.

The Oman Children's Museum is a children's science museum, located near Qurum Nature Park. The museum was established by the Ministry of National Heritage and Culture and opened on November 17, 1990 by Sultan Qaboos bin Said al Said on the 20th National Day celebration in Oman. The museum has 45 exhibits and two demonstrations and comprises 10,000 square feet (930 m2). It was the first science museum in Oman. The museum has many hands-on displays. These include experiences of a fake electric shock, trigger a lightning bolt, launching a hot air balloon, photographing your own shadow, and sending message through a whisper dish. There is also a display named "Eye Spy", which is series of perception panels with illusions designed to offer some insight into how your eyes and brain see things differently.
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Al Alam Palace, Al Jalali and Al Mirani Forts

Located in the heart of Old Muscat

The ceremonial palace of His Majesty Sultan Qaboos bin Said, Al Alam Palace was rebuilt as a royal residence in 1972 and is located in the heart of Old Muscat. It is flanked on either side by the impressive twin Jalali and Mirani Forts originally built by the Portuguese in the 16th century. Both of these majestic buildings are still in use, and although they are not open to the public, tourists can admire the architecture from the yard and at the gates.

At the heart of Old Muscat is Al Alam Palace (“Flag Palace”), the most important of the six royal residences of the ruling monarch, Sultan Qaboos, which are dotted around Muscat, Salalah and Sohar. Built in 1972, the palace is Oman’s most flamboyant example of contemporary Islamic design, with two long wings centred on a colourful, cube-like central building, its flat, overhanging roof supported by extravagantly flared blue and gold columns. The palace isn’t open to the public, although you can get a good view of the facade from the iron gates at the front. The palace complex is impressively stage-managed, approached via a long pedestrianized boulevard framed by two arcaded colonnades, with copious amounts of highly polished marble covering every available surface. On either side stretches a cluster of impressive government buildings: huge, snow-white edifices sporting crenellated rooftops, traditional wooden balconies and window shutters. Look right as you approach the palace and you’ll also see a fine section of the original city walls snaking up the hillside, punctuated with three large watchtowers en route.
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  • 1 Day
  • 3 Days
  • 7 Days
  • 12 Days
  • - 1 Day

    1 Day

    One day may not feel long to experience everything Oman has to offer but with some careful planning and clever selections you can certainly make the most of every minute.

  • - 3 Days

    3 Days

    Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

  • - 7 Days

    7 Days

    If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

  • - 12 Days

    12 Days

    A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.