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12 Day Family Itinerary

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A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.

Day 1

Salalah

Best visited during Khareef season, the Summer months of monsoon when the mountains take on a beautiful hue of green, Salalah and its surrounding is a haven for nature lovers. The starting point of this trip is a trip to explore its amazing marine life. The Hallaniyat Islands are home to many dolphins, whales, coral, and other marine life. There are also several wrecks in the area, including the famous Vasco Da Gama wreck, the Esmerelda.

Bait Al Zubair

A prominent landmark of Old Muscat

Once a private residence, the owner’s family have since turned Bait Al Zubair into a prominent landmark of Old Muscat. From art to photography and traditional artefacts from daily life, the museum is a must for everyone interested in learning more about the Sultanate’s heritage.

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Ubar – Lost City

a fabled lost city

This fabled lost city, also known as the Atlantis of the Sands, is tucked away in the Rub Al Khali (Empty Quarter) and rumoured to have been found near the oasis of Shisr. Ubar once played a vital role as frankincense trade hub and was mentioned in “A Thousand and One Nights” collection of Middle Eastern and South Asian stories and folk tales.

In February 1992, the New York Times announced a major archaeological discovery in the following terms: “Guided by ancient maps and sharp-eyed surveys from space, archaeologists and explorers have discovered a lost city deep in the sands of Arabia, and they are virtually sure it is Ubar, the fabled entrepôt of the rich frankincense trade thousands of years ago.”
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Sohar Souq
Overlooking the Sea of Oman, the new historic Sohar Souq is less than 300 meters north of Sohar Fort. Arabic decorations and exquisite interiors give a shine to the Souq that you can visit whenever you come to Sohar. Various cafes are located in both the ground floor and upstairs.
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Al Khandaq Castle

most picturesque monuments in the region

Considered one of the most picturesque monuments in the region, Husn Al Khandaq is named after the large moat encircling it, something unique in Oman. Built around 200 years ago, its towers are embossed with zigzag designs – so make sure to look up during your visit.

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Day 2 – 3

East of Salalah

East of Salalah are some of Oman’s most interesting attractions, including Wadi Darbat and Mirbat. With its lake and, during the Khareef season, mist-covered hills it is a sight to behold and believed to be one of the most scenic spots in Dhofar. Here, children can go for a small boat ride. Considered to be one the largest solvent sinkholes in the world, Tawi Ateer is a haven for bird watching enthusiasts and those that want to learn more about nature. You’ll soon see how appropriate it is that the name literally translates to The well of birds’. Dhofar’s highest mountain is also home to the Jebel Samhan Nature Reserve, one of the places in the world to find wild Arabian leopards and other larger mammals. Although not open to the public, the plateau before the reserve allows for breath-taking views of the wadis, villages and coast below. Ideal for camping.

Hasik Cliffs

breath-taking limestone formations

Located two hours from Salalah, the cliffs of Hasik form part of the breath-taking limestone formations that run along most of Dhofar’s coastline – this area makes for a spectacular drive.

Positioned at the most eastern end of the Dhofar coast before the cliffs of Jebel Samhan interrupt, Hasik is worth the two-hour drive from Salalah for the journey more than the destination.
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Khawr Taqah

a quaint fishing village

West of Taqah, a quaint fishing village, this lagoon (khawr) combines freshwater plants with other varieties that require higher levels of salinity to thrive. The result is an abundance of marine life here, as well as many different types of birds.

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Al Fizayah Beach

Stunning white sand

Located west of Salalah, past Mughsayl Beach, a hairpin road leads to the stunning white sand of Fizayah Beach.

Fazayah Beach (also spelled as Al-Fazaiah or Al-Fizayah) is one of the best beaches in Oman. Its a 5 kilometers long pristine white sand beach with clear water and a stunning landscape at the back-ground. Experienced driver in 4×4 vehicle will take you there. The journey of Salalah is incomplete without a trip to white sand beaches of Mughsayl and the blowholes overlooking Marneef cave. The blowholes are also referred as Mughsayl Natural Fountains by the tourists. The water jet from the blowholes vary according to the season, but can get as high as 28m in the sky in Khareef season. Unique path leads you to journey by foot where you start your walk from beach and go up to a cave and end up at blowholes.
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Taqah Castle

Restored and is open to the public

Built in the 19th century, Taqah Fort is in the heart of Taqah and a good example of how people used to live in the area. The castle has been restored and is open to the public.

This small but well-preserved castle was built in the 19th century. With a furnished interior, good signage and an accompanying booklet explaining the history of this sardine-producing town, this is one of the better fort museums in Oman. The fort is located in the pretty fishing village of Taqah, which boasts a white-sand beach, a landscaped khor, a fine corniche.
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Day 4

West of Salalah

The natural beauty of the region becomes apparent when travelling in the direction of the border with Yemen. From blowholes and caves to secluded beaches, this day is dedicated to the special highlights located west of Dhofar’s capital, Salalah. A favourite family picnic spot, the end of Mughsayl beach holds a special surprise during Khareef. Only then do the blowholes erupt, pushing sea water metres into the air and drenching anyone adventurous enough to stand too close. Wadi Dawkah makes for a great diversion on your way back to Salalah. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, the location is open to the public with special viewing areas providing panoramic views of the five square kilometres area densely populated with Boswellia sacra, more commonly known as Frankincense trees.

Wadi Darbat

a favourite picnic spot

Darbat Lake at the heart of Wadi Darbat is a favourite picnic spot, with visitors taking short boat rides or barbecuing nears its shores. A 30-metre waterfall feeds the lake during monsoon season (Khareef).

“Wadi Darbat” is located in Dhofar Governorate. The wadi is the most beautiful and spectacular place in Salalah city for the mountain and spring lovers. The place is fully packed with tourists in the autumn season. This wadi carves its way through hills and highlands until it reaches Khawr Ruri. During autumn, the wadi’s water descending from the mountains forms magnificent waterfalls cascading from a height of up to 30 meters (100 feet). “Wadi Darbat” is distinguished by its virgin nature and thick botanical cover, in addition to a natural spring and a number of caves. The wadi’s water is the source of the water filling Teeq Cave’s cells. “Wadi Darbat” is located only a few kilometers behind Taqa, a beach city in Dofar Region. It is located on the left side on the road to Tawi Attir. From Taqa, there are a road sign to “Wadi Darbat”. Follow the tarmac road to the end of the valley, but be warned that you cannot drive freely through the entire valley. The place offers everything that is needed for a memorable family day. You can enjoy with boat riding, Feeding fishes in the lake and you can easily place the BBQ grill, which is no other better place to have barbecue in the region other than “Wadi Darbat”. There are a safety area is exclusively for kids for their safety, and several restaurants and huts that sell food, sweet corns, pop corns and fruits. You can also bring eatable items from any other market on the way.
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Hasik Cliffs

breath-taking limestone formations

Located two hours from Salalah, the cliffs of Hasik form part of the breath-taking limestone formations that run along most of Dhofar’s coastline – this area makes for a spectacular drive.

Positioned at the most eastern end of the Dhofar coast before the cliffs of Jebel Samhan interrupt, Hasik is worth the two-hour drive from Salalah for the journey more than the destination.
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Prophet Ayoub’s Grave

a popular attraction

Tucked away on Jebel Ateen, the tomb of Prophet Ayoub (Job) is a popular attraction. The prophet is said to have left a footprint outside the building after being commanded to strike the ground for a spring to appear.

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Al Baleed Archaeological Park

UNESCO World Heritage Site

This UNESCO World Heritage Site is part of the Land of Frankincense. Al Baleed Archaeological Park in Salalah is a large area with remains of what was once a very important trading port from the 8th to 16th century, enabling the widespread distribution of Frankincense grown further inland.

Standard opening hours are from 8am to 8pm with a modest entrance charge per car.
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Day 5 – 6

Musandam

Easily reached by flight via Muscat, the Musandam Peninsula, an exclave of Oman surrounded by the UAE, enjoys a breath-taking location facing the Strait of Hormuz and Sea of Oman. Musandam has many scenic bays and fjords that can be discovered by boat or Dhow cruise. Dolphins often frequent the waters and so does plenty of other colourful marine life. Jebel Hareem is Musandam’s highest point and what better way to explore it than by mountain bike. Local tour operators can arrange pick up or drop off whenever and wherever required.

Dhow Cruises

a great way to experience Musandam’s coastline

Dhow cruises are a great way to experience Musandam’s coastline in the traditional sense. Many marinas and tour operators provide dhow cruises that can include island visits, swimming, barbecues, and more.

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Khasab Castle

Home to the best ethnographic museums in Oman

Originally built by the Portuguese in the 17th century around a pre-existing circular tower, this well-preserved fort is home to one of the best ethnographic museums in Oman and the Bait Al Qufl, the ‘house of locks’, in the courtyard which was built by an Omani master craftsman.

Khasab Castle was used by the Omanis as a military base to combat the Portugese and later simultaneously as a residence of the Wali of Khasab and as a city prison. The current castle features a cylindrical central tower in the center and a square-shaped outer wall. The current castle compound features an exhibition about the history of Musandam, a model of a traditional elevated summer house, a model of a date storage (Bait Al Quful), an old documents exhibition, and many rooms displaying jewellery, clothes, weapons, kitchen equipment, wedding decorations, and a Quran learning school.
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Village of Lima

famous for its local handicrafts

Surrounded by mountains and accessible by boat, the village of Lima is famous for its local handicrafts - especially the Al Jarz, a small traditional axe. The boat trip itself will take you through stunning marine vistas where you can see unique rock formations.

This is a small village separated from Wilayt Khasab in Musandam Governorate by rugged mountainous peaks. That’s why the best way to reach this village is by boats that will take you through marine vistas that will be engraved in your memory for ever. There visitors will enjoy the fantastic rock formations of the mountain range directly overlooking the sea, and birds hovering over the sapphire waters through the distance that separates Khasab from Lima. The village is known for its local crafts specially the unique AlJarz.
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Telegraph Island

a favourite with tourists

Named after a telegraph station built on the island by the British in the 19th century, Telegraph Island is a favourite with tourists looking to explore the ancient abandoned ruins, snorkel in the surrounding waters or simply enjoy a Dhow cruise to the island to witness the stunning fjords of Khawr Ash Sham.

The expression “going around the bend” is not just an idle phrase. For a handful of British soldiers in the mid-1800s, being stationed “around the bend” was the worst place you could possibly be, a lonely island outpost where soldiers slowly lost their minds in the desert heat. From 1864 to 1869, Jazirat al Maqlab, or “Telegraph Island,” was an active telegraph outpost crucial to communication between India and Britain. For five years after the telegraphy was decommissioned, British soldiers continued to man the isolated outpost. Reportedly, every single man stationed at the outpost “around the bend” of the Musandam peninsula completely lost his mind from the monotony and heat. Stuck for months on the football-field sized island, cut off from the outside world, and subject to intense desert heat, the solders were slowly driven mad. Today the island is a ghostly remnant of the once-great British Empire. The outpost was abandoned in the mid-1870s, and the buildings have crumbled. The island now serves as a snorkeling and fishing destination rather than a strategic communication hub, but the oppressive heat and the lonely atmosphere that helped drive the soldiers “around the bend” remains.
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Day 7

Salmah Plateau

The easiest route to the plateau is to fly into Muscat, following which you can rent a 4WD vehicle to reach the plateau, which is about 120km from Muscat. The plateau itself offers some stunning attractions worth visiting, including Majlis Al Jinn, one of the largest underground caves in the world, the Majlis Al Jinn, is a special undertaking. Prior permission is required from the Ministry of Tourism and the help of a guide is mandatory. If travelling with smaller children, you might wish to opt for a visit to the beehive tombs of Al Jaylan instead, before setting up camp on the plateau.

Yiti Beach

Frequented by locals as well as tourists

The Yiti Beach, located beyond the village of Yiti, is a small beach - about one kilometre long - that can be easily reached by car. Frequented by locals as well as tourists, it is a great spot to enjoy barbecues, camping, and fishing.

Jagged rocks formed by sea salt winds and waves stick out of the Sea of Oman creating the sheltered bay of Yiti Beach. Just 28-kilometres from the centre of Muscat, the beach is known as a place of solitude and relaxation – an escape from the hectic city. The sand takes on an orange hue and the water changes to a deeper blue as the sun sets and the light changes. Lay on the rocks overlooking the beach at twilight or find an area along the strip of soft sand.
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Wadi Mayh

A unique Omani geological site

Wadi Mayh is recognised as a unique Omani geological site, due to its lime stone cliffs and interesting rock formations. The wadi features numerous date palm plantations and irrigation channels as well as water pools where visitors can take a dip and cool off.

Wadi Mayh is a long valley that lies between Yiti and Sifah, along the highway to Quriyat. In the western part of the valley,  an enormous mountain range that appears to have been naturally engraved with many layers created during different geological periods. Now, it looks like a massive display of rock art. This picturesque landscape is dotted with small streams and pools of fresh water, which are an intense turquoise blue in colour. Two villages are conveniently situated on the edge of the wadi in the middle of the valley.
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National Museum Oman

Rich in history and heritage

Opened in 2016, the National Museum of Oman is located opposite the Sultan’s Palace in Old Muscat and showcases the Sultanate’s rich history and heritage, from its earliest settlement through to present day.

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Al Ansab Wetlands

a protected area

Set in the middle of Muscat, the Al Ansab Wetlands are a protected area and an ornithologists dream. Over 293 species of birds stop over at different times throughout the year, with over 80 resident species.

Muscat: Colours and fragrance fill the air at Al Ansab Wetland where winter sees the best of plants and trees bloom. The wetland has 113 species of Omani trees and shrubs. “The wetland has been there since mid- to late 80s but it was not the way it is now. At that time, may be it was used for treating purposes. Since 2011, The company ( Haya ) started focusing more on it and made a lot of changes. It is now all treated water and therefore you do not have any smell in the wetland areas. “With the addition of shrubs and trees, the area of wetland is attracting more birds. Initially, 150 bird species were reported. Now, it is more than 300.” The wetland has five lagoons, the biggest of which has a depth of four metres. The water, besides attracting birds, also supports greenery. Most of the trees and shrubs are naturally grown. But Haya Water team planted 300 trees to create a forest area, which have all grown and today provide extended shade. In the process, there have been other trees that have sprouted naturally such as banyan trees and date palms. A little further away, adjacent to the nursery of the wetland, the team planted more trees.
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Day 8 – 9

Wadi Bani Khalid & A’Sharqiyah Sands

A short drive away, Wadi Bani Khalid is one of the most photographed attractions in Oman. While an entire day can easily be spent here, simply enjoying the sheer beauty of the wadi and its water pools, a trek from here to Wadi Tiwi across the mountain range is a unique experience and one that must only be undertaken with a guide. With smaller children it is recommended to spend the day at Wadi Bani Khalid before heading to one of the many desert camps in the Sharqiyah Sands for one or more unforgettable overnights for the family.

Wadi Bani Khalid

One of the Sultanate’s best-known wadis

One of the Sultanate’s best known wadis, Wadi Bani Khalid is a geographical wonderland of pools, caves and mountains. Unlike other wadis, it enjoys a constant flow of water all year round - perfect for visiting any season.

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Sur Dhow Yard

The only surviving dhow-building yard in Oman.

Close to the Sur Maritime Museum, Sur’s dhow yard is the perfect place to witness craftsman build dhows the traditional way, without plans. This is the only surviving dhow-building yard in Oman.

If there is one industrial town in Oman that has not lost its importance from the days of yore, it’s Sur. You know you’ve entered a town that prides on its traditional heritage when the maze of streets showcase ancient residential dwellings each of which still carry a mark of the past on its majestic carved doors and Arabesque windows. Long considered as Oman’s prime trading ports, the calm and serene coastal town is the capital of A’Sharqiyah on the coast of the of Oman Sea. Sur has always been the epicentre of travel and trade in this region. Its vessels have ruled the waters since many centuries! Its strategic location has always helped in maintaining and monitoring peace in the of Oman Sea and the Indian Ocean. Although it no longer retains its prominence in the trade industry, Sur continues to be the best in building wooden ships, at least in the Gulf region. A couple of centuries back this town built ships for clients in China, India, Iraq and other prominent trade destinations in the region. And although the dhow yards in Sur have reduced considerably given the fast decline in the demand for dhows since almost a century now, the charm and character of the laid-back town remains unfazed.
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Sharqiyah Sands

experience the desert first hand

The Sharqiyah Sands allows visitors to experience the desert first hand, with dunes reaching as far as the horizon and the area teeming with wildlife. Dune bashing is one of the many favourite activities for visitors to the Sharqiyah Sands.

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Al Saleel National Park

It is located to the north of Al Kamil W’al Wafi Wilayat and 57 km from Sur. It consists of three basic geographical types.

The first is the alluvial plain and has a wide yard of acacia and gum Arabic trees, the second is the valleys that split the mountains and the third is the broad hills of these mountains.

This Park is home to the Arabian gazelle, wild cats, Arabian wolves, red fox and Egyptian eagle, along with a variety of turtles and birds.

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Day 10

Turtle watching

The turtle reserve at Ras Al Jinz offers a unique glimpse into the life of turtles, and how for decades they return to the same beach to lay their eggs. A coastal city with colourful past, Sur once was an important trading hub, thanks to its natural harbour and strategic location. At the last remaining Dhow yard, one can witness how Dhows are built by hand – without plans. A true engineering marvel and interesting for the entire family. Green turtles are endangered, so the rangers at the Ras Al Jinz nature reserve take special care not to disturb the animals when showing visitors around – this includes mothers laying eggs at night and hatchlings making their way to the ocean at sunrise.

Bilad Sayt

In the Hajar Mountains

Widely regarded as one of the most beautiful mountain villages in the Sultanate, Bilad Sayt is nestled within the Hajar Mountains and reachable only by 4WD vehicle from Al Hamra or Wadi Bani Awf. Villagers still practice the traditional terrace farming that has served the community for centuries.

You discover the true essence of Arabia — so mystic, so unimaginable and so magical — when your four-wheel drive leaves the bustling cities, heading towards interiors of the arid desert region. Drive to the mountains and villages on weekends and discover the true Arabia. Here in Muscat the Al Hajar mountain ranges offer plenty of options. Bilad Sayt, a fairy tale like village typical of the Arabian settlements of the past, is one of the most picturesque villages in Oman. The mere view of the village will stop you for minutes in awestruck, a ‘wow’ will slowly and quietly roll out of your mouth as you stand there. The village is seated at the foot of towering and dramatic Hajar mountain ranges that just by 2-2.30pm block the sun from falling on the terraced village. Getting there will take a little work — but it’s worth it as it’s one of the unique places to see in Oman.
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Ain Al Kasfa – Al Rustaq

said to have therapeutic qualities

Located at the heart of Al Rustaq, Ain Al Kasfa is a hot spring said to have therapeutic qualities. Purpose-built bathing rooms are available close by for visitors to use, as swimming in the spring itself is not allowed.

Al Rustaq is famous for two impressive and historically important landmarks: Al Hazm Castle (حصن الحزم) and the imposing Al Rustaq Fort (قـلعة الرستاق). Al Hazm Castle is at the outskirts of Al Rustaq and is one of the most famous castles in the Sultanate. The castle was built by Imam Sultan bin Saif II in the early 18th century, who is buried in this castle along with his son.  Al Hazm Castle features a massive beautiful wooden door with intricate writing and it is unique among other Omani castles for having its roof held by columns instead of the traditional wooden roof supports. The massive Al Rustaq Fort, a much older fort dating back to the 13th century, is near the city market and be can be seen from the surrounding hills. The fort is cradled by four tall towers, the tallest being more than 18 meters tall. The fort also has its own falaj water system within it. Both Al Rustaq Fort and Al Hazm Castle are included in the Tentative List to be nominated for the UNESCO World Heritage List. Unfortunately, they were both also closed for renovations during our visit (with typically no foreseen re-opening dates!), but if you climb up the mountain overlooking Rustaq you can see amazing views of the city and Al Rustaq Fort as it is clearly the most dominant feature of the landscape.
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Place and People Museum

a modern art gallery

Place and People Museum is located along Muttrah’s beautiful waterfront – or corniche – and divided into three different exhibits: an old Omani house showcasing living in the Sultanate in the 1950s to 1970s, a museum highlighting Omani clothing and a modern art gallery.

Place and People Museum is an exclusive addition to the Omani cultural scene, opened in January '2011 Located near the Muttrah Fort, the museum is a dream project of Her Highness Sayyida Dr Ghalya bint Fahr bin Taimour Al Said. The Old house is a group of typical Omani houses from the period of 1950 to 1975 that tell the story of the Omanis and their deeply rooted heritage, customs and traditions. The Wedding, the Kitchen and Display Rooms, the Mother and Children’s Room, the Winter Room, the Majlis (Living Room), Musabbeh’s Room describe the earlier Omani lifestyle which still finds echoes in today’s traditions. The museum displays a subtlety combined with a sense of immediacy (to transport the visitor back in time) in showing Omani life at this period in the form of the historic contents of their homes, their art, artifacts and inventions.
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Bait Na’aman Castle

perfect for visitors to catch a glimpse at past times

Constructed in the 16th century as private residence for visiting imans, Bait Na’aman Castle is perfect for visitors to catch a glimpse at past times. This is thanks to the many traditional furniture and fittings on display, as well as other features such as the underground falaj system.

Rather more interesting than Barka’s fort is the beautiful old fortified house of Bait Na’aman. The unusually tall and narrow house, with alternating square and round towers, is thought to have been constructed around 1691–92 by imam Bil’arab bin Sultan (or possibly his brother, and successor as imam, Saif bin Sultan), and was used by both imams during their visits to the area. According to one tradition, this is also where Sultan Said bin Sultan murdered his unpopular predecessor Badr bin Saif in 1806 with a single blow from his khanjar. The entire building was beautifully restored in 1991. Unlike most of Oman’s forts, the house has been fitted out with a lavish selection of traditional furnishings and fittings, giving the place an engagingly domestic atmosphere and making it much easier to imagine what life was like for its former inhabitants than in most other Omani heritage buildings. Downstairs you’ll find the original bathroom and stone toilet, both connected to an underground falaj which formerly brought water all the way from Nakhal. There’s also a storage room, in which dates were pressed (the holes in the floor were used to siphon off the juice), as well as a pitch-black ladies’ jail. The main living areas are situated upstairs, with a sequence of rooms attractively furnished with traditional rugs, cushions, crockery and jewellery. These include the men’s and ladies’ majlis, plus a quaint bedroom with four-poster bed and a wooden hatch in the floor through which water could be drawn up from below. Nearby is the private majlis of the imam, equipped with a secret escape passage, and a watchtower with pit-like jails for miscreants. Further stairs lead up to the roof. The main tower is supported by beautiful teak beams, with old pictures of ships scratched onto the walls. The tower originally housed six cannon, backed up by three more cannon in the house’s second tower – an impressive array of firepower for what was essentially a private residence rather than a proper fort. To reach the house, drive around 5km north of the roundabout by the Lulu hypermarket along the main coastal highway then turn right off the highway, following the signs to A’Naaman and (just afterwards) the Barka Health Center, following the road as it twists back towards the coast. The house is about 3km down the road on your left – it’s not signposted, but is instantly recognizable.
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Day 11

Tiwi

Located between Sur and Muscat, the white pebble and sand beaches of Bimmah, Fins, and Tiwi are an incredible sight. The roads approaching Wadi Tiwi are twisty and narrow, and the perfect excuse to park the car and explore the area on foot. Villages along the route are surrounded by date palms and still use falaj, the traditional methods of irrigation. Close t o Wadi Tiwi is Wadi Shab, which can only be reached by boat or by wading across during low tide. Natural water pools, a waterfall and hidden cave await those entering the wadi. Bring your swimming gear and enjoy.

Ubar – Lost City

a fabled lost city

This fabled lost city, also known as the Atlantis of the Sands, is tucked away in the Rub Al Khali (Empty Quarter) and rumoured to have been found near the oasis of Shisr. Ubar once played a vital role as frankincense trade hub and was mentioned in “A Thousand and One Nights” collection of Middle Eastern and South Asian stories and folk tales.

In February 1992, the New York Times announced a major archaeological discovery in the following terms: “Guided by ancient maps and sharp-eyed surveys from space, archaeologists and explorers have discovered a lost city deep in the sands of Arabia, and they are virtually sure it is Ubar, the fabled entrepôt of the rich frankincense trade thousands of years ago.”
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Razat Spring

a preferred picnic spot

Razat Spring is especially rich in vegetation and water, making it a preferred picnic spot throughout the year.

Salalah: The Dhofar Governorate has a collection of natural springs some of which are perennial while others are seasonal and come into action during the monsoon season. The one such spring that is popular with visitors to Salalah throughout the year is Ain Razat. It is one of the main sources of water in Salalah today. Ain Razat continues its prominent role providing water for farms . The white and magenta water lilies add to the serenity of the ambience. Another attraction of Ain Razat is its cave which would have been very difficult to have an access to during the monsoon as the ground becomes slippery, but the Dhofar Municipality has built steps to the cave. Once there one can enjoy the view of Ain Razat’s surroundings.
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Jabreen Castle

A must-see destination

Jabreen Castle is a must-see destination located just a short drive from Bahla. It is truly an architectural masterpiece with intricate mural designs, traditional Omani crafts, and a beautiful view of the surrounding date palm oasis.

Rising without competition from the surrounding plain, Jabreen Castle is an impressive sight. Even if you have had a surfeit of fortifications, it's worth making the effort to clamber over one more set of battlements – Jabreen is one of the best-preserved and whimsical castles of them all. Head for the flagpole for a bird's-eye view of the latticed-window courtyard at the heart of the keep; the rooms here have distinctive painted ceilings.
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Wadi Sharm

A small oasis

Located in a fertile valley, Wadi Sharm small oasis has its own falaj system for irrigation making its way through the date palm plantation and an unrestored fort. Visitors are welcome to explore the wadi and its villages on foot.

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Day 12

Muscat

Oman’s capital is always worth a visit. After days on the road, it is the perfect place to end the perfect holiday. Located at the Ministry of Heritage & Culture, the Natural History Museum offers interesting insights into Oman’s natural history, from its geology to its flora and fauna. The skeleton of a washed ashore sperm whale is displayed, providing a unique glimpse at one of the largest mammals in the world. One of the many city beaches, Al Qurum Beach is great for long walks or simply watching local footballers play against each other – or joining in. A perfect way to end the trip.

Royal Opera House Muscat

A beautiful example of modern Omani architecture

The Royal Opera House Muscat hosts world-class shows and brings artists from around the world to Oman, including ballet, operas, musicals and more. Luxury shopping and fine dining is available at the Opera Galleria next door.

Royal Opera House Muscat is the leading arts and culture organization in the Sultanate of Oman.The vision of the Opera House is to serve as a centre of excellence in global cultural engagement. We strive to enrich lives through diverse artistic, cultural, and educational programs. The multidisciplinary work of Royal Opera House Muscat showcases rich and diverse artistic creations from Oman, the region, and the world; provides a space for culture and socioeconomic development reflections and actions; inspires audiences and nurtures creativity with innovative programs; fosters cultural vitality and unleashes talent; promotes cultural tourism; and puts cultural diplomacy into practice by reinvigorating global and multi-disciplinary collaborations and exchanges.
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Oman Natural History Museum

Located at the Ministry of Heritage and Culture

The Oman Natural History Museum provides a fascinating insight into the geological heritage of the Sultanate and its impressive flora and fauna, with displays of mammals, insects and birds as well as a beautiful botanical garden outside.

Highlights include the Whale Room, which features the large skeleton of a sperm whale which washed up on Oman’s shores in the 1980s. Natural History Museum of Oman was opened on 30 December 1985,  . The Museum shows the Omani environment diversity through offers of terrain, geology, plants, insects, wild animals and marine life. Despite the small size of the Museum but abounding of facts dealing with biodiversity of the Sultanate of Oman. The Museum features stuffed animals rarely found in the wilds of types and species living in the land of Oman, skeletons of marine organisms, birds and reptiles lived in Omani environment.
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Oil and Gas Exhibition Centre

Learn about the oil and gas industry

The Oman Oil and Gas Exhibition Centre highlights the journey of the discovery, extraction, and use of fossil fuels in Oman through interactive displays.

Established in 1995 under Petroleum Development Oman (PDO), the centre particularly appeals to visitors interested in learning about the oil and gas industry and how it has contributed to the growth of infrastructure throughout Oman.

The PDO planetarium lies adjacent to the centre and boasts a “full dome” digital system to teach kids and adults about astronomy in an engaging way.

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Hiking – Riyam Walk

spectacular views over the sea

Starting opposite Riyam park, the Riyam Walk begins with a steep climb at the end of which hikers are rewarded with spectacular views over the sea and surrounding area. The path gradually descends into an old abandoned village and takes you through to Muttrah, a great way of exploring the old part of Muscat first hand.

Hiking in Muscat, a capital city? Yes it is possible. One of the particularity of Muscat is that it is composed of neighborhoods separated by rocky hills. This means that you can climb those hills to get nice views, especially on trail C38 between Riyam and Muttrah.
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  • 1 Day
  • 3 Days
  • 7 Days
  • 12 Days
  • - 1 Day

    1 Day

    One day may not feel long to experience everything Oman has to offer but with some careful planning and clever selections you can certainly make the most of every minute.

  • - 3 Days

    3 Days

    Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

  • - 7 Days

    7 Days

    If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

  • - 12 Days

    12 Days

    A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.