TRAVEL ALERT! Important information about the Coronavirus situation in Oman

7 Day Family Itinerary

Home > Trip Planner > 7 Day Family Trip

If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

Day 1

Muscat to Sur

The coastal road to Sur has several attractions along the way worth a small detour, including one of the largest water dams in Arabia. Wadi Dayqah Dam is one of the largest dams in the region and, thanks to its visitor friendly facilities, a great place to bring the family for a picnic overlooking the dam. Misfat Al Abryeen is a hidden gem and an easy wadi to explore, although a 4WD vehicle is required to reach it. Water pools and green vegetation all-year round make it a favourite with locals and visitors alike. Close to Bimmah Sinkhole and the village of Tiwi, Fins Beach is a great place to let the kids enjoy the white sand and pebble beach while setting up camp.

Salmah Plateau

Camping Hot Spot

For a real off-road adventure, a trip to Salmah Plateau offers a great mix of panoramic views, traditional villages and sights such as the Beehive Tombs of Al Jaylah/Shir or the entrance to Majlis Al Jinz, one of the largest cave chambers in the world.

Read MoreRead Less
Oman Children’s Museum

a scientific museum

Set in two distinctive domes in the north of Qurum, the Oman Children’s Museum is a scientific museum that delves into biology, interesting optical illusions, and other interactive displays for children.

The Oman Children's Museum is a children's science museum, located near Qurum Nature Park. The museum was established by the Ministry of National Heritage and Culture and opened on November 17, 1990 by Sultan Qaboos bin Said al Said on the 20th National Day celebration in Oman. The museum has 45 exhibits and two demonstrations and comprises 10,000 square feet (930 m2). It was the first science museum in Oman. The museum has many hands-on displays. These include experiences of a fake electric shock, trigger a lightning bolt, launching a hot air balloon, photographing your own shadow, and sending message through a whisper dish. There is also a display named "Eye Spy", which is series of perception panels with illusions designed to offer some insight into how your eyes and brain see things differently.
Read MoreRead Less
Quriyat

a favourite with bird watchers

The fishing village of Quriyat, en route to Sur, is a favourite with bird watchers. Species such as Kingfishers and Grey Herons are known to frequent the surrounding lagoons.

Read MoreRead Less
Bird Watching in Quriyat

a favourite with bird watchers

The fishing village of Quriyat, en route to Sur, is a favourite with bird watchers. Species such as kingfishers and grey herons are known to frequent the surrounding lagoons.

Read MoreRead Less

Day 2

Sur & Ras Jinz

A day exploring Sur’s maritime history and turtle watching. If you ever wondered how Dhows were built, the last remaining Dhow yard in Sur offers a unique insight into this ancient tradition. The nearby Sur Maritime Museum is also worth a visit. Overlooking a lagoon and the ocean, the Al Ayjah lighthouse or watch tower was once built by the Portuguese. A walk through the neighbourhood of Al Ayjah, with its old merchant houses, offers a glimpse of Sur’s former importance as trading hub. The Ras Al Jinz nature reserve has been set up to allow for sustainable viewing of turtles in their natural habitat. At night, Green turtles scamper up the beach to lay their eggs. Rangers ensure that visitors do not harm the animals or their environments.

Quriyat

a favourite with bird watchers

The fishing village of Quriyat, en route to Sur, is a favourite with bird watchers. Species such as Kingfishers and Grey Herons are known to frequent the surrounding lagoons.

Read MoreRead Less
Salmah Plateau

Camping Hot Spot

For a real off-road adventure, a trip to Salmah Plateau offers a great mix of panoramic views, traditional villages and sights such as the Beehive Tombs of Al Jaylah/Shir or the entrance to Majlis Al Jinz, one of the largest cave chambers in the world.

Read MoreRead Less
Oman Children’s Museum

a scientific museum

Set in two distinctive domes in the north of Qurum, the Oman Children’s Museum is a scientific museum that delves into biology, interesting optical illusions, and other interactive displays for children.

The Oman Children's Museum is a children's science museum, located near Qurum Nature Park. The museum was established by the Ministry of National Heritage and Culture and opened on November 17, 1990 by Sultan Qaboos bin Said al Said on the 20th National Day celebration in Oman. The museum has 45 exhibits and two demonstrations and comprises 10,000 square feet (930 m2). It was the first science museum in Oman. The museum has many hands-on displays. These include experiences of a fake electric shock, trigger a lightning bolt, launching a hot air balloon, photographing your own shadow, and sending message through a whisper dish. There is also a display named "Eye Spy", which is series of perception panels with illusions designed to offer some insight into how your eyes and brain see things differently.
Read MoreRead Less
Majlis Al Jinn Cave

requires special permission to visit

One of the largest underground caves in the world, Majlis Al Jinn is a natural wonder located on the Salmah Plateau. In 2007, Austrian sky diver Felix Baumgartner based jumped into the cave, a distance of about 120 metres. Exploring this cave requires a special permission from the Ministry of Tourism Oman.

Majlis al Jinn is one of the largest cave chamber in the world by surface area. The base of the cave is58,000 square meter. The only way to get in is through one of three tiny openings at the top, all of which have been formed over time as the accumulation of rainwater dissolved the limestone covering. This cave chamber, located 60 miles from Muscat, was discovered by Americans Don Davidson Jr. and his wife Cheryl Jones in 1983. They noticed the strange holes in the ground on aerial photographs, and eventually made the journey out via helicopter. When they looked down into the small openings, they saw the sandy floor below - over 500 feet down. Just days later, they rappelled down for the first time. In an attempt to find an appropriate name for the chamber, they asked the Omanis in the surrounding area if they had a local name for it, to which the response was no. They did, however, mention that they believed that the cave was filled with genies, which are prevalent in Omani mythology. In Arabic, the word for “genie” is “al-Jinn”, so hence, the American explorers named the cave is “Majlis al Jinn. “Majlis” means “meeting place,” making the cave name, “the meeting place of the genies.”
Read MoreRead Less

Day 3 – 4

A’Sharqiyah Sands

Setting off from Raz al Jinz, the desert awaits but not before a refreshing swim at one of Oman’s most well-known wadis. Wadi Bani Khalid is one of the most scenic in the Sultanate. Natural pools are hidden in beautiful rock formations and invite a refreshing swim. Locals live nearby, so please dress modestly at all times. There are plenty of activities in the desert to keep the entire family entertained, from camel riding to dune driving, from sandboarding to quad biking. Stargazing at night, around the campfire, is a favourite with all and offered by most desert camps in the region.

Wadi Shab

A famous waterfall and crystal clear water pools,

Located just off the Sur-Muscat coastal road, Wadi Shab can be reached via a short boat ride. A short hike will bring visitors to the wadi’s famous waterfall and crystal clear water pools, and even a partially submerged cave.

Visiting Wadi Shab is one of the top things to do in Oman and you need to include it on your list. Think a fantastic gorge, warm blue pools, and a hidden waterfall!
Read MoreRead Less
Ibra

A modern city

Once a trading hub at the gates to the Sharqiyah Sands, Ibra today is a modern city complete with university, hospital and hotels. Its many forts and mosques are some of the oldest in Oman, with Al Minzifah and the Wednesday Women’s Market just some of the must-see highlights.

Read MoreRead Less
Ras Al Jinz

A famous nature reserve

Thousands of sea turtles migrate yearly to the shores of Oman to lay their eggs. Ras Al Jinz is a nature reserve famous for the opportunity to witness the endangered green sea turtle in its natural habitat during nesting and hatching season.

Ras Al Jinz Turtle Reserve, a unique natural landscape, unspoiled shorelines, golden deserts, luxuriant green oases and rugged mountains. Ras Al Jinz is world renown for the nesting of the endangered green turtle (Cheloniamydas), probably the most important nesting concentration on the Indian Ocean. This is the only place where public can watch the nesting process of these amazing sea-giants. A once in a lifetime opportunity.
Read MoreRead Less
Qalhat – Bibi Maryam Tomb

Explore the ruins

Once the first capital of Oman, Qalhat’s history traces back to the Bronze Age. The Portuguese occupied the city until being expelled in the late 16th century. Since then, the settlement has slowly fallen to ruin, with only the tomb of Bibi Maryam remaining as testament to Qalhat’s former importance.

Qalhat was once a shining jewel along the Omani coastline. The Indian Ocean trade route brought many people through the ancient city, which Italian explorer Marco Polo described as having “fine bazaars and one of the most beautiful mosques.” Today, a single mausoleum is all that bears witness to the city’s former glory. Some say the lonely tomb was built by Baha al-Din Ayaz, king of the Hormuz Empire, for his wife, Bibi Maryam. But others maintain that it was indeed her who built it for him.
Read MoreRead Less

Day 5

Jebel Shams

Oman’s highest mountain offers vistas to remember. The hike along the cliff edge, known as the Rim Walk, to the abandoned village of As Sab is a fairly easy hike, but not to be undertaken with smaller children. In such cases, we recommend smaller walks atop the plateau to enjoy the view of the ‘Grand Canyon of Oman’.

Sur Dhow Yard

The only surviving dhow-building yard in Oman.

Close to the Sur Maritime Museum, Sur’s dhow yard is the perfect place to witness craftsman build dhows the traditional way, without plans. This is the only surviving dhow-building yard in Oman.

If there is one industrial town in Oman that has not lost its importance from the days of yore, it’s Sur. You know you’ve entered a town that prides on its traditional heritage when the maze of streets showcase ancient residential dwellings each of which still carry a mark of the past on its majestic carved doors and Arabesque windows. Long considered as Oman’s prime trading ports, the calm and serene coastal town is the capital of A’Sharqiyah on the coast of the of Oman Sea. Sur has always been the epicentre of travel and trade in this region. Its vessels have ruled the waters since many centuries! Its strategic location has always helped in maintaining and monitoring peace in the of Oman Sea and the Indian Ocean. Although it no longer retains its prominence in the trade industry, Sur continues to be the best in building wooden ships, at least in the Gulf region. A couple of centuries back this town built ships for clients in China, India, Iraq and other prominent trade destinations in the region. And although the dhow yards in Sur have reduced considerably given the fast decline in the demand for dhows since almost a century now, the charm and character of the laid-back town remains unfazed.
Read MoreRead Less
Jebel Qatar

The Hanging Gardens

This unique mountain is situated between Al-Ain and Al Buraimi and is known as the 'Hanging Gardens' due to the lush greenery found at intervals on the cliff side.

Read MoreRead Less
Khawr Najd

Oman’s most scenic fjords

Picture-perfect Khawr Najd is one of Oman’s most scenic fjords, accessible via a road surrounded by high cliffs and leading to crystal clear waters below.

Read MoreRead Less
Dolphin Watching

teeming with marine life

Muscat’s coastline is teeming with marine life, including numerous dolphin pods. Dolphin watching trips can be organized by local tour operators.

Alongwith exploring dophins you have the chance to view the scenic beauty of Oman's coastline over the prestine waters of Oman's capital area and experiance the breaktaking views of some of it's landmarks. The most commonly encountered species off Muscat are spinner dolphins, which delight the viewer with their spinning leaps. The Spinners are often joined by long-nosed common dolphins, in mixed groups. Also encountered off Muscat, but on a less regular basis are Bryde's Whales, Humpback Whales, Risso's Dolphins, Bottlenose Dolphins, False Killer Whale and the occasional Killer Whale group amongst others.
Read MoreRead Less

Day 6

Al Hoota Cave & Wadi Bani Awf

A visit to Al Hoota Cave is fun for the entire family, followed by crossing the mountain in a 4WD vehicle. An underground lake with blind fish and amazing stalactites and stalagmites formations make Al Hoota Cave a must-see when in the area. Not to mention the magnetic train operating inside the cave that brings visitors to the cave entrance. The mountain crossing to Wadi Bani Awf by 4WD vehicle is not for the faint hearted and should be undertaken by experienced drivers only. Visitors can expect amazing vistas and secluded mountain villages. Alternatively, there is a highway from Nizwa to Muscat.

Wakan Village – Wadi Mistal

a beautifully terraced farming village

Overlooking Wadi Mistal, Wakan is a beautifully terraced farming village, set 2,000 metres above sea level in the Hajar Mountains. With hiking tracks and viewing platforms that make the most of the panoramic views of the wadi below, it is truly worth the visit.

Located 2,000 meters above sea level and in the Western Hajar Mountains is Wakan village (قرية وكان), a small mountain village with beautiful terraced gardens overlooking the surrounding mountains above and Wadi Mistal below. Wakan village is officially part of Wilayt Nakhal in the South Batinah Governorate, although its located right in the border with Al Dakhiliyah Governorate through Al Hajar mountain range. A viewing platform is the first sight that greets you as soon as you enter the village. It offers spectacular views of Wadi Mistal and the surrounding mountains. There is also a visitors information center building which is still not opened. From there you can exploring this beautiful village by foot. There are a couple of hiking tracks that start at the village, and they are marked by the familiar yellow, green and red flag that mark most hiking tracks in Oman.
Read MoreRead Less
Sohar Souq
Overlooking the Sea of Oman, the new historic Sohar Souq is less than 300 meters north of Sohar Fort. Arabic decorations and exquisite interiors give a shine to the Souq that you can visit whenever you come to Sohar. Various cafes are located in both the ground floor and upstairs.
Read MoreRead Less
Al Ashkharah

The spectacular sandy beaches surround Al Ashkharah on both sides and extend for several kilometers, it is embraced by Arabian Sea, and there are many umbrellas on the beach that allow tourists to enjoy seeing the beauty of the beach and its golden sands, it is also a place for flocks of Gull and wader.

Read MoreRead Less
Muscat Gate Museum

One of the most photographed landmarks

One of the most photographed landmarks in the Sultanate, this museum is set over a road that marks the entrance into Old Muscat. Visitors can view general and historic information about Oman and enjoy stunning views of Muttrah corniche from the terrace.

Spanning the road between the old walled city of Muscat and the Corniche nestles the Muscat Gate Museum. The museum transport visitors to a different world, an enriching journey of the emergence and evolution of the Sultanate of Oman, also stands testament to Muscat’s history and artifacts. The gates of the museum formerly marked Muscat city’s boundary for the city was once enclosed within the fortified walls. The gateway was used until 1970 to keep intruders out of the walled vicinity. Though the museum houses limited exhibits, it is more popular for being an excellent vantage point offering breathtaking vistas of the Diwan and the Corniche. Once you are done exploring the historical artifacts, take a drive up to the aerial mast to the neighboring hillock to enjoy a panoramic view of the Muttrah area and the Muscat city before it merges with the horizon of the Al Riyam Park.
Read MoreRead Less

Day 7

Muscat

Time to unwind and explore Oman’s capital. Including some time at one of the many city beaches, such as Qurum Beach which is great for beach walks or a swim. The Children’s Museum is a science museum housed in two unique, domed buildings not far from the beach. The Children Public Library is just opposite. What better way to end a family holiday than with a sunset Dhow cruise, offered by several tour operators. You might even spot dolphins!

Dolphin Watching

teeming with marine life

Muscat’s coastline is teeming with marine life, including numerous dolphin pods. Dolphin watching trips can be organized by local tour operators.

Alongwith exploring dophins you have the chance to view the scenic beauty of Oman's coastline over the prestine waters of Oman's capital area and experiance the breaktaking views of some of it's landmarks. The most commonly encountered species off Muscat are spinner dolphins, which delight the viewer with their spinning leaps. The Spinners are often joined by long-nosed common dolphins, in mixed groups. Also encountered off Muscat, but on a less regular basis are Bryde's Whales, Humpback Whales, Risso's Dolphins, Bottlenose Dolphins, False Killer Whale and the occasional Killer Whale group amongst others.
Read MoreRead Less
Muscat Gate Museum

One of the most photographed landmarks

One of the most photographed landmarks in the Sultanate, this museum is set over a road that marks the entrance into Old Muscat. Visitors can view general and historic information about Oman and enjoy stunning views of Muttrah corniche from the terrace.

Spanning the road between the old walled city of Muscat and the Corniche nestles the Muscat Gate Museum. The museum transport visitors to a different world, an enriching journey of the emergence and evolution of the Sultanate of Oman, also stands testament to Muscat’s history and artifacts. The gates of the museum formerly marked Muscat city’s boundary for the city was once enclosed within the fortified walls. The gateway was used until 1970 to keep intruders out of the walled vicinity. Though the museum houses limited exhibits, it is more popular for being an excellent vantage point offering breathtaking vistas of the Diwan and the Corniche. Once you are done exploring the historical artifacts, take a drive up to the aerial mast to the neighboring hillock to enjoy a panoramic view of the Muttrah area and the Muscat city before it merges with the horizon of the Al Riyam Park.
Read MoreRead Less
National Museum Oman

Rich in history and heritage

Opened in 2016, the National Museum of Oman is located opposite the Sultan’s Palace in Old Muscat and showcases the Sultanate’s rich history and heritage, from its earliest settlement through to present day.

Read MoreRead Less
Yiti Beach

Frequented by locals as well as tourists

The Yiti Beach, located beyond the village of Yiti, is a small beach - about one kilometre long - that can be easily reached by car. Frequented by locals as well as tourists, it is a great spot to enjoy barbecues, camping, and fishing.

Jagged rocks formed by sea salt winds and waves stick out of the Sea of Oman creating the sheltered bay of Yiti Beach. Just 28-kilometres from the centre of Muscat, the beach is known as a place of solitude and relaxation – an escape from the hectic city. The sand takes on an orange hue and the water changes to a deeper blue as the sun sets and the light changes. Lay on the rocks overlooking the beach at twilight or find an area along the strip of soft sand.
Read MoreRead Less
  • 1 Day
  • 3 Days
  • 7 Days
  • 12 Days
  • - 1 Day

    1 Day

    One day may not feel long to experience everything Oman has to offer but with some careful planning and clever selections you can certainly make the most of every minute.

  • - 3 Days

    3 Days

    Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

  • - 7 Days

    7 Days

    If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

  • - 12 Days

    12 Days

    A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.