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7 Day Family Itinerary

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If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

Day 1

Muscat to Sur

The coastal road to Sur has several attractions along the way worth a small detour, including one of the largest water dams in Arabia. Wadi Dayqah Dam is one of the largest dams in the region and, thanks to its visitor friendly facilities, a great place to bring the family for a picnic overlooking the dam. Misfat Al Abryeen is a hidden gem and an easy wadi to explore, although a 4WD vehicle is required to reach it. Water pools and green vegetation all-year round make it a favourite with locals and visitors alike. Close to Bimmah Sinkhole and the village of Tiwi, Fins Beach is a great place to let the kids enjoy the white sand and pebble beach while setting up camp.

Stal Gallery

modern visual arts

This art gallery was created to promote modern visual arts and aims to bring local talent into the spotlight and provide a platform for internationally acclaimed artists. Visitors can find the gallery in Madinat Sultan Qaboos, close to the British Council.

Stal Gallery is home to many exciting Art Exhibitions. From contemporary artists to famous classic works, hosting local and international art collections - it always has something interesting to see. Explore Stal Gallery Collections, Exhibitions, Artists, Art Classes and Art courses, life painting sessions, Residency Calls for artists.
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Muscat Gate Museum

One of the most photographed landmarks

One of the most photographed landmarks in the Sultanate, this museum is set over a road that marks the entrance into Old Muscat. Visitors can view general and historic information about Oman and enjoy stunning views of Muttrah corniche from the terrace.

Spanning the road between the old walled city of Muscat and the Corniche nestles the Muscat Gate Museum. The museum transport visitors to a different world, an enriching journey of the emergence and evolution of the Sultanate of Oman, also stands testament to Muscat’s history and artifacts. The gates of the museum formerly marked Muscat city’s boundary for the city was once enclosed within the fortified walls. The gateway was used until 1970 to keep intruders out of the walled vicinity. Though the museum houses limited exhibits, it is more popular for being an excellent vantage point offering breathtaking vistas of the Diwan and the Corniche. Once you are done exploring the historical artifacts, take a drive up to the aerial mast to the neighboring hillock to enjoy a panoramic view of the Muttrah area and the Muscat city before it merges with the horizon of the Al Riyam Park.
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Wadi Dayqah Dam

An amazing picnic area

Wadi Dayqah Dam is one of the largest on the Arabian Peninsula and a source of irrigation and protection for the surrounding villages, as it reduces the number of flash floods in the area. A picnic area has been built atop the dam with great views for all to enjoy.

Wadi Dayqah Dam is quite a spectacular sight! Set in the rugged limestone Wadi (valley) this huge construction is a real contrast of natural Omani beauty and impressive human engineering. Opened in 2012 the dam was built to collect the periodic rain fall from the high peaks above and control the volume of water flowing through the narrow torrent, ‘dayqah’, to the villages below. This still maintains the ancient “Falaj” irrigation system whilst controlling the surges of water rolling off the hillside. The dam is quite a spectacle for Oman and is by far the highest in the country. The water lake is 8 kilometres (5 miles) long and can hold 100 million cubic meters of rain water.
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Daymaniyat Islands

Snorkelling and Diving

Located off the coast between Barka and Al Seeb, the Daymaniyat Islands are surrounded by turquoise waters that are perfect for snorkelling and diving. The islands are a protected area, home to endangered sea turtles, untouched coral reefs, and exotic fish.

The main tourist draw between Barka and Sohar is the Sawadi and Daymaniyat islands (and the adjacent Al Sawadi Beach Resort), one of the country’s leading dive spots, but equally rewarding to visit for a snorkel or swim. The rocky and windswept Sawadi Islands lie just offshore. The largest of the seven islands lies almost within spitting distance of the beach, a large rocky hump topped by a string of watchtowers, while the other smaller islands lie further out to sea. It’s possible to walk across the sand to the main island at low tide, though take care you don’t get stranded when the tide comes back in; at other times boat trips can be arranged by bargaining with the local fishermen on the beach for around 5 OR, while snorkelling trips can be set up through Extra Divers at the Al Sawadi Beach Resort. The beach here is littered with exotic-looking seashells, perfect for a stroll and a spot of beachcombing.
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Day 2

Sur & Ras Jinz

A day exploring Sur’s maritime history and turtle watching. If you ever wondered how Dhows were built, the last remaining Dhow yard in Sur offers a unique insight into this ancient tradition. The nearby Sur Maritime Museum is also worth a visit. Overlooking a lagoon and the ocean, the Al Ayjah lighthouse or watch tower was once built by the Portuguese. A walk through the neighbourhood of Al Ayjah, with its old merchant houses, offers a glimpse of Sur’s former importance as trading hub. The Ras Al Jinz nature reserve has been set up to allow for sustainable viewing of turtles in their natural habitat. At night, Green turtles scamper up the beach to lay their eggs. Rangers ensure that visitors do not harm the animals or their environments.

Daymaniyat Islands

Snorkelling and Diving

Located off the coast between Barka and Al Seeb, the Daymaniyat Islands are surrounded by turquoise waters that are perfect for snorkelling and diving. The islands are a protected area, home to endangered sea turtles, untouched coral reefs, and exotic fish.

The main tourist draw between Barka and Sohar is the Sawadi and Daymaniyat islands (and the adjacent Al Sawadi Beach Resort), one of the country’s leading dive spots, but equally rewarding to visit for a snorkel or swim. The rocky and windswept Sawadi Islands lie just offshore. The largest of the seven islands lies almost within spitting distance of the beach, a large rocky hump topped by a string of watchtowers, while the other smaller islands lie further out to sea. It’s possible to walk across the sand to the main island at low tide, though take care you don’t get stranded when the tide comes back in; at other times boat trips can be arranged by bargaining with the local fishermen on the beach for around 5 OR, while snorkelling trips can be set up through Extra Divers at the Al Sawadi Beach Resort. The beach here is littered with exotic-looking seashells, perfect for a stroll and a spot of beachcombing.
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Bird Watching in Quriyat

a favourite with bird watchers

The fishing village of Quriyat, en route to Sur, is a favourite with bird watchers. Species such as kingfishers and grey herons are known to frequent the surrounding lagoons.

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Place and People Museum

a modern art gallery

Place and People Museum is located along Muttrah’s beautiful waterfront – or corniche – and divided into three different exhibits: an old Omani house showcasing living in the Sultanate in the 1950s to 1970s, a museum highlighting Omani clothing and a modern art gallery.

Place and People Museum is an exclusive addition to the Omani cultural scene, opened in January '2011 Located near the Muttrah Fort, the museum is a dream project of Her Highness Sayyida Dr Ghalya bint Fahr bin Taimour Al Said. The Old house is a group of typical Omani houses from the period of 1950 to 1975 that tell the story of the Omanis and their deeply rooted heritage, customs and traditions. The Wedding, the Kitchen and Display Rooms, the Mother and Children’s Room, the Winter Room, the Majlis (Living Room), Musabbeh’s Room describe the earlier Omani lifestyle which still finds echoes in today’s traditions. The museum displays a subtlety combined with a sense of immediacy (to transport the visitor back in time) in showing Omani life at this period in the form of the historic contents of their homes, their art, artifacts and inventions.
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Camping – Fins

a coastal village

Only a short drive from Bimmah Sinkhole, Fins is a coastal village mainly known for its hidden beaches and coves framed by white sands, turquoise waters and the Al Hajar Mountains as backdrop. Perfect for a memorable camping experience.

It’s legal to wild camp in Oman. And, done responsibly, it’s one of the most rewarding ways to take in the country’s varied terrain.
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Day 3 – 4

A’Sharqiyah Sands

Setting off from Raz al Jinz, the desert awaits but not before a refreshing swim at one of Oman’s most well-known wadis. Wadi Bani Khalid is one of the most scenic in the Sultanate. Natural pools are hidden in beautiful rock formations and invite a refreshing swim. Locals live nearby, so please dress modestly at all times. There are plenty of activities in the desert to keep the entire family entertained, from camel riding to dune driving, from sandboarding to quad biking. Stargazing at night, around the campfire, is a favourite with all and offered by most desert camps in the region.

Bidiyah

At the edge of the Sharqiyah Sands

Located 233km from Muscat, Bidiyah is a collection of villages at the edge of the Sharqiyah Sands. Home to Bedouin people from the desert, it is the perfect place to experience traditional camel or horse races or visit its famous Eid market.

A three- to four-hour drive from Muscat, Bidiyah is in the Sharqiyah Sands, the most popular destination in Oman for dune-bashing, desert-crossings, and camping. No visit to Oman would be complete without seeing these spectacular seas of sand.
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Sharqiyah Sands

experience the desert first hand

The Sharqiyah Sands allows visitors to experience the desert first hand, with dunes reaching as far as the horizon and the area teeming with wildlife. Dune bashing is one of the many favourite activities for visitors to the Sharqiyah Sands.

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Wadi Shab

A famous waterfall and crystal clear water pools,

Located just off the Sur-Muscat coastal road, Wadi Shab can be reached via a short boat ride. A short hike will bring visitors to the wadi’s famous waterfall and crystal clear water pools, and even a partially submerged cave.

Visiting Wadi Shab is one of the top things to do in Oman and you need to include it on your list. Think a fantastic gorge, warm blue pools, and a hidden waterfall!
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Wadi Tiwi

best explored on foot

Not far from Wadi Shab is Wadi Tiwi, which is lined by small villages and date and banana plantations. Although the wadi can be accessed by car, it is best explored on foot, with a two-day hike possible across the mountains to Wadi Bani Khalid.

A couple of kilometres south of Wadi Shab lies the almost identical Wadi Tiwi, another spectacularly deep and narrow gorge carved out of the mountains, running between towering cliffs right down to the sea. It’s less unspoiled than Wadi Shab surrounded by lush plantations of date and banana, and criss-crossed with a network of gurgling aflaj.
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Day 5

Jebel Shams

Oman’s highest mountain offers vistas to remember. The hike along the cliff edge, known as the Rim Walk, to the abandoned village of As Sab is a fairly easy hike, but not to be undertaken with smaller children. In such cases, we recommend smaller walks atop the plateau to enjoy the view of the ‘Grand Canyon of Oman’.

Ubar – Lost City

a fabled lost city

This fabled lost city, also known as the Atlantis of the Sands, is tucked away in the Rub Al Khali (Empty Quarter) and rumoured to have been found near the oasis of Shisr. Ubar once played a vital role as frankincense trade hub and was mentioned in “A Thousand and One Nights” collection of Middle Eastern and South Asian stories and folk tales.

In February 1992, the New York Times announced a major archaeological discovery in the following terms: “Guided by ancient maps and sharp-eyed surveys from space, archaeologists and explorers have discovered a lost city deep in the sands of Arabia, and they are virtually sure it is Ubar, the fabled entrepôt of the rich frankincense trade thousands of years ago.”
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Yiti Beach

Frequented by locals as well as tourists

The Yiti Beach, located beyond the village of Yiti, is a small beach - about one kilometre long - that can be easily reached by car. Frequented by locals as well as tourists, it is a great spot to enjoy barbecues, camping, and fishing.

Jagged rocks formed by sea salt winds and waves stick out of the Sea of Oman creating the sheltered bay of Yiti Beach. Just 28-kilometres from the centre of Muscat, the beach is known as a place of solitude and relaxation – an escape from the hectic city. The sand takes on an orange hue and the water changes to a deeper blue as the sun sets and the light changes. Lay on the rocks overlooking the beach at twilight or find an area along the strip of soft sand.
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Ras Al Jinz

A famous nature reserve

Thousands of sea turtles migrate yearly to the shores of Oman to lay their eggs. Ras Al Jinz is a nature reserve famous for the opportunity to witness the endangered green sea turtle in its natural habitat during nesting and hatching season.

Ras Al Jinz Turtle Reserve, a unique natural landscape, unspoiled shorelines, golden deserts, luxuriant green oases and rugged mountains. Ras Al Jinz is world renown for the nesting of the endangered green turtle (Cheloniamydas), probably the most important nesting concentration on the Indian Ocean. This is the only place where public can watch the nesting process of these amazing sea-giants. A once in a lifetime opportunity.
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Nizwa Fort

One of the most popular tourist attractions

One of the most popular tourist attractions in the Sultanate, Nizwa Fort is a living testament of Oman’s expert craftsmanship and provides an excellent illustration of the way Omani people lived in ancient times. It is one of the oldest forts in the country, with the underlying structure dating back to the 12th century. Located right next to Nizwa Souq, it is easily recognisable by its large cylindrical watchtower.

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Day 6

Al Hoota Cave & Wadi Bani Awf

A visit to Al Hoota Cave is fun for the entire family, followed by crossing the mountain in a 4WD vehicle. An underground lake with blind fish and amazing stalactites and stalagmites formations make Al Hoota Cave a must-see when in the area. Not to mention the magnetic train operating inside the cave that brings visitors to the cave entrance. The mountain crossing to Wadi Bani Awf by 4WD vehicle is not for the faint hearted and should be undertaken by experienced drivers only. Visitors can expect amazing vistas and secluded mountain villages. Alternatively, there is a highway from Nizwa to Muscat.

Wakan Village – Wadi Mistal

a beautifully terraced farming village

Overlooking Wadi Mistal, Wakan is a beautifully terraced farming village, set 2,000 metres above sea level in the Hajar Mountains. With hiking tracks and viewing platforms that make the most of the panoramic views of the wadi below, it is truly worth the visit.

Located 2,000 meters above sea level and in the Western Hajar Mountains is Wakan village (قرية وكان), a small mountain village with beautiful terraced gardens overlooking the surrounding mountains above and Wadi Mistal below. Wakan village is officially part of Wilayt Nakhal in the South Batinah Governorate, although its located right in the border with Al Dakhiliyah Governorate through Al Hajar mountain range. A viewing platform is the first sight that greets you as soon as you enter the village. It offers spectacular views of Wadi Mistal and the surrounding mountains. There is also a visitors information center building which is still not opened. From there you can exploring this beautiful village by foot. There are a couple of hiking tracks that start at the village, and they are marked by the familiar yellow, green and red flag that mark most hiking tracks in Oman.
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Al Awabi

Nestled at the foot of the Al Hajar Mountain range

Located between Nakhal and Al Rustaq, Al Awabi is a quaint traditional-looking Omani town nestled at the foot of the Al Hajar Mountain range.

The small village of Al Awabi straddles Hwy 13, the road that links the important towns of Barka with Rustaq. With some attractive modern houses painted in pastel hues in defiance of the national 'white only' regulation, this is a typical Batinah Plain village. It boasts a fort but not very much else by way of sights, but it has an important function as the gateway to Wadi Bani Kharus.
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Mirbat

once the capital of Dhofar

East of Salalah, the coastal town of Mirbat was once the capital of Dhofar, trading in frankincense and Arabian horses. Today, visitors can spot dhows heading out to fish, or explore the old merchant houses near Mirbat Fort.

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Al Buraimi Park

a family-friendly oasis

Al Buraimi’s largest park is a quiet, family-friendly oasis in the city centre with an abundance of well-maintained greenery and play equipment.

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Day 7

Muscat

Time to unwind and explore Oman’s capital. Including some time at one of the many city beaches, such as Qurum Beach which is great for beach walks or a swim. The Children’s Museum is a science museum housed in two unique, domed buildings not far from the beach. The Children Public Library is just opposite. What better way to end a family holiday than with a sunset Dhow cruise, offered by several tour operators. You might even spot dolphins!

Bird Watching in Quriyat

a favourite with bird watchers

The fishing village of Quriyat, en route to Sur, is a favourite with bird watchers. Species such as kingfishers and grey herons are known to frequent the surrounding lagoons.

Read MoreRead Less
Yiti Beach

Frequented by locals as well as tourists

The Yiti Beach, located beyond the village of Yiti, is a small beach - about one kilometre long - that can be easily reached by car. Frequented by locals as well as tourists, it is a great spot to enjoy barbecues, camping, and fishing.

Jagged rocks formed by sea salt winds and waves stick out of the Sea of Oman creating the sheltered bay of Yiti Beach. Just 28-kilometres from the centre of Muscat, the beach is known as a place of solitude and relaxation – an escape from the hectic city. The sand takes on an orange hue and the water changes to a deeper blue as the sun sets and the light changes. Lay on the rocks overlooking the beach at twilight or find an area along the strip of soft sand.
Read MoreRead Less
Place and People Museum

a modern art gallery

Place and People Museum is located along Muttrah’s beautiful waterfront – or corniche – and divided into three different exhibits: an old Omani house showcasing living in the Sultanate in the 1950s to 1970s, a museum highlighting Omani clothing and a modern art gallery.

Place and People Museum is an exclusive addition to the Omani cultural scene, opened in January '2011 Located near the Muttrah Fort, the museum is a dream project of Her Highness Sayyida Dr Ghalya bint Fahr bin Taimour Al Said. The Old house is a group of typical Omani houses from the period of 1950 to 1975 that tell the story of the Omanis and their deeply rooted heritage, customs and traditions. The Wedding, the Kitchen and Display Rooms, the Mother and Children’s Room, the Winter Room, the Majlis (Living Room), Musabbeh’s Room describe the earlier Omani lifestyle which still finds echoes in today’s traditions. The museum displays a subtlety combined with a sense of immediacy (to transport the visitor back in time) in showing Omani life at this period in the form of the historic contents of their homes, their art, artifacts and inventions.
Read MoreRead Less
Wadi Mayh

A unique Omani geological site

Wadi Mayh is recognised as a unique Omani geological site, due to its lime stone cliffs and interesting rock formations. The wadi features numerous date palm plantations and irrigation channels as well as water pools where visitors can take a dip and cool off.

Wadi Mayh is a long valley that lies between Yiti and Sifah, along the highway to Quriyat. In the western part of the valley,  an enormous mountain range that appears to have been naturally engraved with many layers created during different geological periods. Now, it looks like a massive display of rock art. This picturesque landscape is dotted with small streams and pools of fresh water, which are an intense turquoise blue in colour. Two villages are conveniently situated on the edge of the wadi in the middle of the valley.
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  • - 1 Day

    1 Day

    One day may not feel long to experience everything Oman has to offer but with some careful planning and clever selections you can certainly make the most of every minute.

  • - 3 Days

    3 Days

    Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

  • - 7 Days

    7 Days

    If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

  • - 12 Days

    12 Days

    A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.