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7 Day Adventure Itinerary

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If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

Day 1 – 2

Salalah

The starting point for this trip is Salalah, Oman’s second largest city and gateway to a variety of adventures. The Anti-Gravity point is amongst one of the most popular points of interest in Dhofar and is located close to Mirbat. It makes for a great detour on the way to Jebel Samhan. There are a host of attractions on the way to the peak of Jebel Samhan, ranging from Tawi Ateer Sinkhole to Teeq Cave. The best camping spots are atop its plateau, overlooking the wadis, villages and ocean below. Dhofar offers great diving and snorkelling opportunities along its coast. A day can easily be spent for diving and snorkelling before proceeding to the airport to return to Muscat.

Al Fizayah Beach

Stunning white sand

Located west of Salalah, past Mughsayl Beach, a hairpin road leads to the stunning white sand of Fizayah Beach.

Fazayah Beach (also spelled as Al-Fazaiah or Al-Fizayah) is one of the best beaches in Oman. Its a 5 kilometers long pristine white sand beach with clear water and a stunning landscape at the back-ground. Experienced driver in 4×4 vehicle will take you there. The journey of Salalah is incomplete without a trip to white sand beaches of Mughsayl and the blowholes overlooking Marneef cave. The blowholes are also referred as Mughsayl Natural Fountains by the tourists. The water jet from the blowholes vary according to the season, but can get as high as 28m in the sky in Khareef season. Unique path leads you to journey by foot where you start your walk from beach and go up to a cave and end up at blowholes.
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Teeq Cave & Tawi Ateer Sinkhole

One of the world’s largest sinkholes

En route to the top of Jebel Samhan, Tawi Ateer is one of the world’s largest sinkholes. It is filled with shrubs and plants, turning it into a haven for birds which earned it the nickname “Bird Well”.  From the entrance of the nearby Teeq Cave visitors can enjoy panoramic views of the sinkhole and its waterfalls from the cave’s entrance.

“Tawi Ateer Sinkhole” is the most famous sinkhole in Dhofar governorate known as the ‘Bird Well’ gained international fame after its discovery in 1997 by a team of Slovenian explorers in collaboration with Sultan Qaboos University as one of the largest solvent sinkholes in the world. This adds to the Sultanate’s rich biodiversity, its geographical and historical richness, and its historical and archaeological sites, as well as its remains of early civilization, all of which endorses the Governorate of Dhofar as a tourist destination, and boosts the various opportunities for those interested in discovery, along with nature and adventure lovers. The capacity of the Teeq Sinkhole is about 975 thousand cubic metres. Its diameter is between 130 to 150 metres and its depth is 211 metres. Water flowing down the valleys has resulted in the formation of the sinkhole, with its magnificent waterfalls along the intersection with Teeq Sinkhole. In the surroundings of Teeq sinkhole there are several interesting structures, as round collapse dolines, walls around this sinkhole are very slope, and there are wadis enter the sinkhole as very spectacular waterfalls.
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Hallaniyat Islands

historic shipwrecks that dot the sea bed

Humpback whales and other marine life have made the water surrounding the Hallaniyat Islands home. These, together with several historic shipwrecks that dot the sea bed, provide great opportunities for any diving enthusiasts.

The Hallaniyat Islands offer untouched dive sites, and new ones are being discovered all the time. Tourism in the area is relatively new and the islands are only visited by liveaboard, giving you the chance to be one of the first to explore this untouched area. The reefs are covered with hard and soft corals with colourful residents including plenty of macro life. The seascapes include walls, spur and groove and some overhangs with a lot of fish life. Diving highlights are undoubtedly the opportunity to be in the water with the resident population of humpback whales but may also include encounters with manta rays and other whales. Anything is possible here. The islands boast a healthy marine life and you’ll see huge schools of fish at most dive sites. Huge pods of dolphin are often seen as are honeycomb morays and green turtles. There are also opportunities to explore some wrecks. The diving in the area is exploratory and suited to experienced divers.
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Razat Spring

a preferred picnic spot

Razat Spring is especially rich in vegetation and water, making it a preferred picnic spot throughout the year.

Salalah: The Dhofar Governorate has a collection of natural springs some of which are perennial while others are seasonal and come into action during the monsoon season. The one such spring that is popular with visitors to Salalah throughout the year is Ain Razat. It is one of the main sources of water in Salalah today. Ain Razat continues its prominent role providing water for farms . The white and magenta water lilies add to the serenity of the ambience. Another attraction of Ain Razat is its cave which would have been very difficult to have an access to during the monsoon as the ground becomes slippery, but the Dhofar Municipality has built steps to the cave. Once there one can enjoy the view of Ain Razat’s surroundings.
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Day 3

Muscat

Muscat offers a range of activities that would please any thrill seeker. Start by chartering a boat or going on a Dhow cruise to explore Muscat’s coast and wildlife. Special dolphin watching trips can be arranged with a wide variety of tour operators. Alternatively, a day on the water can also include diving and snorkelling. The Daymaniyat Islands are always worth a day trip, with turtles, rays and whale sharks having been spotted.

Majlis Al Jinn Cave

requires special permission to visit

One of the largest underground caves in the world, Majlis Al Jinn is a natural wonder located on the Salmah Plateau. In 2007, Austrian sky diver Felix Baumgartner based jumped into the cave, a distance of about 120 metres. Exploring this cave requires a special permission from the Ministry of Tourism Oman.

Majlis al Jinn is one of the largest cave chamber in the world by surface area. The base of the cave is58,000 square meter. The only way to get in is through one of three tiny openings at the top, all of which have been formed over time as the accumulation of rainwater dissolved the limestone covering. This cave chamber, located 60 miles from Muscat, was discovered by Americans Don Davidson Jr. and his wife Cheryl Jones in 1983. They noticed the strange holes in the ground on aerial photographs, and eventually made the journey out via helicopter. When they looked down into the small openings, they saw the sandy floor below - over 500 feet down. Just days later, they rappelled down for the first time. In an attempt to find an appropriate name for the chamber, they asked the Omanis in the surrounding area if they had a local name for it, to which the response was no. They did, however, mention that they believed that the cave was filled with genies, which are prevalent in Omani mythology. In Arabic, the word for “genie” is “al-Jinn”, so hence, the American explorers named the cave is “Majlis al Jinn. “Majlis” means “meeting place,” making the cave name, “the meeting place of the genies.”
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Quriyat

a favourite with bird watchers

The fishing village of Quriyat, en route to Sur, is a favourite with bird watchers. Species such as Kingfishers and Grey Herons are known to frequent the surrounding lagoons.

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Wadi Al Khoud

great for off-roading

Located close to the old village of Al Khoud, Wadi Al Khoud is great for off-roading, with its stony bed and small water pools. It leads to the village of Fanja.

“Wadi Al Khoudh” is located  in Wilayat Al Seeb, and is considered one of the largest wadi basins in the Sultanate. Pools are formed in the wadi following heavy rain. It is well worth a visit, to enjoy the green salience, the beautiful rock formations surrounding and its clear water pools and springs of water of the valley
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Omani French Museum

Established by His Majesty, Sultan Qaboos bin Said

Honouring the close relationship Oman and France have enjoyed for centuries, the Omani French Museum was established by His Majesty, Sultan Qaboos bin Said and former French President, the late François Mitterrand in 1992. It is housed in Bait Faransa, the former residence of a French consul in Old Muscat.

With galleries detailing relations between the two countries, this museum provides an interesting snapshot of mostly 19th-century colonial life in Muscat. Of particular interest are a series of old photographs and maps documenting the capital in the last century. There's also a Paris map showing the itinerary of His Majesty Sultan Qaboos during his state visit in 1989.
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Day 4 – 5

A’Sharqiyah Sands

Just a three-hour drive from Muscat, the A’Sharqiyah Sands provide a wide range of exciting activities for the intrepid traveller. Setting off early in a convoy and with an experienced local guide, the crossing can take up to two days and is a breath-taking experience. Get ready for a unique insight into the Bedouin lifestyle and an opportunity to enjoy the stunning desert landscape. Camping under the stars is an unforgettable experience.

Sharqiyah Sands

experience the desert first hand

The Sharqiyah Sands allows visitors to experience the desert first hand, with dunes reaching as far as the horizon and the area teeming with wildlife. Dune bashing is one of the many favourite activities for visitors to the Sharqiyah Sands.

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Ras Al Jinz

A famous nature reserve

Thousands of sea turtles migrate yearly to the shores of Oman to lay their eggs. Ras Al Jinz is a nature reserve famous for the opportunity to witness the endangered green sea turtle in its natural habitat during nesting and hatching season.

Ras Al Jinz Turtle Reserve, a unique natural landscape, unspoiled shorelines, golden deserts, luxuriant green oases and rugged mountains. Ras Al Jinz is world renown for the nesting of the endangered green turtle (Cheloniamydas), probably the most important nesting concentration on the Indian Ocean. This is the only place where public can watch the nesting process of these amazing sea-giants. A once in a lifetime opportunity.
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Qalhat – Bibi Maryam Tomb

Explore the ruins

Once the first capital of Oman, Qalhat’s history traces back to the Bronze Age. The Portuguese occupied the city until being expelled in the late 16th century. Since then, the settlement has slowly fallen to ruin, with only the tomb of Bibi Maryam remaining as testament to Qalhat’s former importance.

Qalhat was once a shining jewel along the Omani coastline. The Indian Ocean trade route brought many people through the ancient city, which Italian explorer Marco Polo described as having “fine bazaars and one of the most beautiful mosques.” Today, a single mausoleum is all that bears witness to the city’s former glory. Some say the lonely tomb was built by Baha al-Din Ayaz, king of the Hormuz Empire, for his wife, Bibi Maryam. But others maintain that it was indeed her who built it for him.
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Al Ashkharah

The spectacular sandy beaches surround Al Ashkharah on both sides and extend for several kilometers, it is embraced by Arabian Sea, and there are many umbrellas on the beach that allow tourists to enjoy seeing the beauty of the beach and its golden sands, it is also a place for flocks of Gull and wader.

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Day 6

Turtle watching

A day filled with a refreshing swim and turtle watching. A quick detour en-route to Sur, Wadi Bani Khalid is one of the most scenic in the Sultanate. Natural pools are hidden in beautiful rock formations and invite a refreshing swim. Locals live nearby, so please dress modestly at all times. The nature reserve at Ras Al Jinz has been set up to allow for sustainable viewing of turtles in their natural habitat. At night, Green turtles scamper up the beach to lay their eggs. Rangers ensure that visitors do not harm the animals or their environments. Pre-booking is required.

Duqm Rock Garden

Feels like stepping onto another planet

Located about 550km from Muscat, visiting this geographical marvel feels like stepping onto another planet. Limestone and sandstone rock formations eroded by wind and weather cover a large area. Look closely and you might even be able to spot fossils.

Whichever way you approach this place, you’re likely to have traveled through hundreds of kilometers of rocky desert. It is, therefore, somewhat surprising to find 3 square km of desert fenced off and signposted “Rock Garden.” If you leave behind any preconceived ideas of what a garden may look like, and focus instead on the rock part of the name, you’ll be better prepared for the site. At first sight, there is little (if any) difference between the fenced off and the surrounding area. Yet, once you start wandering around, you’ll find a curious array of sandstone and limestone formations. Water, wind and millions of years combined managed to create this bizarre landscape. Almost perfectly spherical stones sit next to rocks resembling animals, thrones, human body parts, and whatever else your imagination can conjure up. Some large rocks stand balanced on smaller ones, while others sit at improbable angles. It may not be the most jaw-dropping site you’ll ever see, but it does provide the chance to marvel at the beauty of rocks. There is something hypnotic about contemplating the way time has made some rocks smooth, and others jagged, some flaky and others scaly, and so on. If you take time to notice these little variations, the Rock Garden has a striking variety of rock surfaces, shapes, and colors.
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Al Buraimi Park

a family-friendly oasis

Al Buraimi’s largest park is a quiet, family-friendly oasis in the city centre with an abundance of well-maintained greenery and play equipment.

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Wadi Kitnah

A canyoning haven

Cut into the stone, this wadi is a chain of water pools and submerged caves that make it a canyoning haven. Those that prefer a more leisurely hike, can follow the wadi’s edge to or from Kitnah village.

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Pink Lagoons of Al Kahil

A striking bright pink

Found in the central part of Al Wusta, the pink lagoons of Al Kahil and Al Jazir derive their name from the colour the lagoons take on when algae change the appearance of the water and turn the surrounding sand a striking bright pink.

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Day 7

Wadi Tiwi & Wadi Shab

Explore some of Oman’s most stunning wadis on foot. Along the coastal road from Sur to Muscat, Wadi Tiwi is also known as ‘the wadi of nine villages’. Its beauty is best explored on foot, with emerald water pools and date plantations lining the walking routes through the villages. Wadi Shab can only be explored on foot, and reached via a short boat ride (during high tide). The hike into the wadi is not too strenuous and rewards visitors with natural water pools, waterfalls and even a submerged cave.

Muttrah Souq and Fish Market

Highlights of this historic waterfront

Located close to each other along Muttrah’s scenic corniche, Muttrah Souq and Fish Market are the highlights of this historic waterfront. Early each morning, local fishermen sell their fresh catch at the fish market and Muttrah Souq is the perfect place to barter for traditional silver jewellery, Frankincense, fabrics and many more unique souvenirs.

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Majlis Al Jinn Cave

requires special permission to visit

One of the largest underground caves in the world, Majlis Al Jinn is a natural wonder located on the Salmah Plateau. In 2007, Austrian sky diver Felix Baumgartner based jumped into the cave, a distance of about 120 metres. Exploring this cave requires a special permission from the Ministry of Tourism Oman.

Majlis al Jinn is one of the largest cave chamber in the world by surface area. The base of the cave is58,000 square meter. The only way to get in is through one of three tiny openings at the top, all of which have been formed over time as the accumulation of rainwater dissolved the limestone covering. This cave chamber, located 60 miles from Muscat, was discovered by Americans Don Davidson Jr. and his wife Cheryl Jones in 1983. They noticed the strange holes in the ground on aerial photographs, and eventually made the journey out via helicopter. When they looked down into the small openings, they saw the sandy floor below - over 500 feet down. Just days later, they rappelled down for the first time. In an attempt to find an appropriate name for the chamber, they asked the Omanis in the surrounding area if they had a local name for it, to which the response was no. They did, however, mention that they believed that the cave was filled with genies, which are prevalent in Omani mythology. In Arabic, the word for “genie” is “al-Jinn”, so hence, the American explorers named the cave is “Majlis al Jinn. “Majlis” means “meeting place,” making the cave name, “the meeting place of the genies.”
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Dolphin Watching

teeming with marine life

Muscat’s coastline is teeming with marine life, including numerous dolphin pods. Dolphin watching trips can be organized by local tour operators.

Alongwith exploring dophins you have the chance to view the scenic beauty of Oman's coastline over the prestine waters of Oman's capital area and experiance the breaktaking views of some of it's landmarks. The most commonly encountered species off Muscat are spinner dolphins, which delight the viewer with their spinning leaps. The Spinners are often joined by long-nosed common dolphins, in mixed groups. Also encountered off Muscat, but on a less regular basis are Bryde's Whales, Humpback Whales, Risso's Dolphins, Bottlenose Dolphins, False Killer Whale and the occasional Killer Whale group amongst others.
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Oil and Gas Exhibition Centre

Learn about the oil and gas industry

The Oman Oil and Gas Exhibition Centre highlights the journey of the discovery, extraction, and use of fossil fuels in Oman through interactive displays.

Established in 1995 under Petroleum Development Oman (PDO), the centre particularly appeals to visitors interested in learning about the oil and gas industry and how it has contributed to the growth of infrastructure throughout Oman.

The PDO planetarium lies adjacent to the centre and boasts a “full dome” digital system to teach kids and adults about astronomy in an engaging way.

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  • - 1 Day

    1 Day

    One day may not feel long to experience everything Oman has to offer but with some careful planning and clever selections you can certainly make the most of every minute.

  • - 3 Days

    3 Days

    Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

  • - 7 Days

    7 Days

    If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

  • - 12 Days

    12 Days

    A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.