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7 Day Adventure Itinerary

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If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

Day 1 – 2

Salalah

The starting point for this trip is Salalah, Oman’s second largest city and gateway to a variety of adventures. The Anti-Gravity point is amongst one of the most popular points of interest in Dhofar and is located close to Mirbat. It makes for a great detour on the way to Jebel Samhan. There are a host of attractions on the way to the peak of Jebel Samhan, ranging from Tawi Ateer Sinkhole to Teeq Cave. The best camping spots are atop its plateau, overlooking the wadis, villages and ocean below. Dhofar offers great diving and snorkelling opportunities along its coast. A day can easily be spent for diving and snorkelling before proceeding to the airport to return to Muscat.

Jebel Samhan

home to Oman’s Leopard Sanctuary

Dhofar’s highest mountain is also home to Oman’s Leopard Sanctuary, for which special permission to visit is required. However, visitors can explore a host of attractions ranging from the Tawi Ateer Sinkhole to the round houses of the indigenous Jebbali tribe, before setting up camp on the peak’s plateau – just before  the sanctuary’s entrance.

Jebel Samhan is one of the major mountain ranges of Dhofar, whose highest peak reaches 2,100 meters. Jebel Samhan has many levels that are traversed by deep and narrow mountain passes, some of which are up to a thousand feet deep. In the plain of Jebel Samhan different plant species such as acacia and frankincense trees grow. The narrow mountain passes are poor in water, but there are numerous streams that serve as an important source of water for most of the animals living here. (Classified as an endangered species) In addition to the Arabian leopards are many other mammals native to these mountains, including the Arabian Gazelle, the fox and the Nubian goat.
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Wadi Darbat

a favourite picnic spot

Darbat Lake at the heart of Wadi Darbat is a favourite picnic spot, with visitors taking short boat rides or barbecuing nears its shores. A 30-metre waterfall feeds the lake during monsoon season (Khareef).

“Wadi Darbat” is located in Dhofar Governorate. The wadi is the most beautiful and spectacular place in Salalah city for the mountain and spring lovers. The place is fully packed with tourists in the autumn season. This wadi carves its way through hills and highlands until it reaches Khawr Ruri. During autumn, the wadi’s water descending from the mountains forms magnificent waterfalls cascading from a height of up to 30 meters (100 feet). “Wadi Darbat” is distinguished by its virgin nature and thick botanical cover, in addition to a natural spring and a number of caves. The wadi’s water is the source of the water filling Teeq Cave’s cells. “Wadi Darbat” is located only a few kilometers behind Taqa, a beach city in Dofar Region. It is located on the left side on the road to Tawi Attir. From Taqa, there are a road sign to “Wadi Darbat”. Follow the tarmac road to the end of the valley, but be warned that you cannot drive freely through the entire valley. The place offers everything that is needed for a memorable family day. You can enjoy with boat riding, Feeding fishes in the lake and you can easily place the BBQ grill, which is no other better place to have barbecue in the region other than “Wadi Darbat”. There are a safety area is exclusively for kids for their safety, and several restaurants and huts that sell food, sweet corns, pop corns and fruits. You can also bring eatable items from any other market on the way.
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Hasik Cliffs

breath-taking limestone formations

Located two hours from Salalah, the cliffs of Hasik form part of the breath-taking limestone formations that run along most of Dhofar’s coastline – this area makes for a spectacular drive.

Positioned at the most eastern end of the Dhofar coast before the cliffs of Jebel Samhan interrupt, Hasik is worth the two-hour drive from Salalah for the journey more than the destination.
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Anti-Gravity Point – Mirbat

Anti-Gravity Point

Not far from Mirbat, people from all around the world come to this Anti-Gravity Point to experience the out-of-this-world feeling of having their car seemingly move up-hill with no driver input or power.

Many people come to Salalah Anit Gravity Point to see their cars going up the hill at Neutral gear (without any acceleration). This is a really amazing experience and a unique one. The car can move at a speed of more than 40 to 60 kilometers per hour without any acceleration. This point is near Tawi Atair / Mirbat and you can visit this place while going to Mirbat. You can also plan to go to this place after visiting Wadi Darbat and driving for aproximately 20 to 30 minutes on the Eastern side.
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Day 3

Muscat

Muscat offers a range of activities that would please any thrill seeker. Start by chartering a boat or going on a Dhow cruise to explore Muscat’s coast and wildlife. Special dolphin watching trips can be arranged with a wide variety of tour operators. Alternatively, a day on the water can also include diving and snorkelling. The Daymaniyat Islands are always worth a day trip, with turtles, rays and whale sharks having been spotted.

Muttrah Souq and Fish Market

Highlights of this historic waterfront

Located close to each other along Muttrah’s scenic corniche, Muttrah Souq and Fish Market are the highlights of this historic waterfront. Early each morning, local fishermen sell their fresh catch at the fish market and Muttrah Souq is the perfect place to barter for traditional silver jewellery, Frankincense, fabrics and many more unique souvenirs.

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Daymaniyat Islands

Snorkelling and Diving

Located off the coast between Barka and Al Seeb, the Daymaniyat Islands are surrounded by turquoise waters that are perfect for snorkelling and diving. The islands are a protected area, home to endangered sea turtles, untouched coral reefs, and exotic fish.

The main tourist draw between Barka and Sohar is the Sawadi and Daymaniyat islands (and the adjacent Al Sawadi Beach Resort), one of the country’s leading dive spots, but equally rewarding to visit for a snorkel or swim. The rocky and windswept Sawadi Islands lie just offshore. The largest of the seven islands lies almost within spitting distance of the beach, a large rocky hump topped by a string of watchtowers, while the other smaller islands lie further out to sea. It’s possible to walk across the sand to the main island at low tide, though take care you don’t get stranded when the tide comes back in; at other times boat trips can be arranged by bargaining with the local fishermen on the beach for around 5 OR, while snorkelling trips can be set up through Extra Divers at the Al Sawadi Beach Resort. The beach here is littered with exotic-looking seashells, perfect for a stroll and a spot of beachcombing.
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Salmah Plateau

Camping Hot Spot

For a real off-road adventure, a trip to Salmah Plateau offers a great mix of panoramic views, traditional villages and sights such as the Beehive Tombs of Al Jaylah/Shir or the entrance to Majlis Al Jinz, one of the largest cave chambers in the world.

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Yiti Beach

Frequented by locals as well as tourists

The Yiti Beach, located beyond the village of Yiti, is a small beach - about one kilometre long - that can be easily reached by car. Frequented by locals as well as tourists, it is a great spot to enjoy barbecues, camping, and fishing.

Jagged rocks formed by sea salt winds and waves stick out of the Sea of Oman creating the sheltered bay of Yiti Beach. Just 28-kilometres from the centre of Muscat, the beach is known as a place of solitude and relaxation – an escape from the hectic city. The sand takes on an orange hue and the water changes to a deeper blue as the sun sets and the light changes. Lay on the rocks overlooking the beach at twilight or find an area along the strip of soft sand.
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Day 4 – 5

A’Sharqiyah Sands

Just a three-hour drive from Muscat, the A’Sharqiyah Sands provide a wide range of exciting activities for the intrepid traveller. Setting off early in a convoy and with an experienced local guide, the crossing can take up to two days and is a breath-taking experience. Get ready for a unique insight into the Bedouin lifestyle and an opportunity to enjoy the stunning desert landscape. Camping under the stars is an unforgettable experience.

Al Saleel National Park

It is located to the north of Al Kamil W’al Wafi Wilayat and 57 km from Sur. It consists of three basic geographical types.

The first is the alluvial plain and has a wide yard of acacia and gum Arabic trees, the second is the valleys that split the mountains and the third is the broad hills of these mountains.

This Park is home to the Arabian gazelle, wild cats, Arabian wolves, red fox and Egyptian eagle, along with a variety of turtles and birds.

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Al Ashkharah

The spectacular sandy beaches surround Al Ashkharah on both sides and extend for several kilometers, it is embraced by Arabian Sea, and there are many umbrellas on the beach that allow tourists to enjoy seeing the beauty of the beach and its golden sands, it is also a place for flocks of Gull and wader.

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Jalan Bani Bu Ali

A town steeped in history with old watchtowers

Jalan Bani Bu Ali is a town steeped in history with old watchtowers, an old fort and ornate carved wooden doors at every turn. However, it is most famous for the souq, which is open every Friday morning and sells a variety of modern and traditional goods.

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Wadi Tiwi

best explored on foot

Not far from Wadi Shab is Wadi Tiwi, which is lined by small villages and date and banana plantations. Although the wadi can be accessed by car, it is best explored on foot, with a two-day hike possible across the mountains to Wadi Bani Khalid.

A couple of kilometres south of Wadi Shab lies the almost identical Wadi Tiwi, another spectacularly deep and narrow gorge carved out of the mountains, running between towering cliffs right down to the sea. It’s less unspoiled than Wadi Shab surrounded by lush plantations of date and banana, and criss-crossed with a network of gurgling aflaj.
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Day 6

Turtle watching

A day filled with a refreshing swim and turtle watching. A quick detour en-route to Sur, Wadi Bani Khalid is one of the most scenic in the Sultanate. Natural pools are hidden in beautiful rock formations and invite a refreshing swim. Locals live nearby, so please dress modestly at all times. The nature reserve at Ras Al Jinz has been set up to allow for sustainable viewing of turtles in their natural habitat. At night, Green turtles scamper up the beach to lay their eggs. Rangers ensure that visitors do not harm the animals or their environments. Pre-booking is required.

Jebel al Harim

A haven for biking enthusiasts

Offering spectacular views and adventurous paths, Jebel Hareem is the Musandam’s highest peak and a haven for biking enthusiasts. Local tour operators offer guided mountain biking tours.

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Wadi Bimah

Known as "Snake Gorge"

Snake Gorge is located halfway through Wadi Bani Awf, a wadi that crosses the Al Hajar mountain range; it is famous for an extreme form of hiking – canyoning. This entails crossing the gorge on foot, across various boulders and water pools. Given the required level of fitness, those wishing to explore it are asked to arrange a guide.

Snake Gorge, also called Wadi Bimah, is a gorge or wadi in the Ad Dakhiliyah Region of Oman. It is popular with hikers. It is a fantastic route for jumping off small cliffs into water pools. There are also natural water slides. However, it is flash-flood prone, and in the 1996, a small group of hikers drowned. In 2014, 11 tourists from Dubai in the UAE were trapped during rains, but managed to survive on the rocks for 2 hours, despite losing their vehicle in the process. The Royal Oman Police and PACDA frequently try to prevent such tragedies by sending out weather warnings.
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Wadi Bani Khalid

One of the Sultanate’s best-known wadis

One of the Sultanate’s best known wadis, Wadi Bani Khalid is a geographical wonderland of pools, caves and mountains. Unlike other wadis, it enjoys a constant flow of water all year round - perfect for visiting any season.

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Telegraph Island

a favourite with tourists

Named after a telegraph station built on the island by the British in the 19th century, Telegraph Island is a favourite with tourists looking to explore the ancient abandoned ruins, snorkel in the surrounding waters or simply enjoy a Dhow cruise to the island to witness the stunning fjords of Khawr Ash Sham.

The expression “going around the bend” is not just an idle phrase. For a handful of British soldiers in the mid-1800s, being stationed “around the bend” was the worst place you could possibly be, a lonely island outpost where soldiers slowly lost their minds in the desert heat. From 1864 to 1869, Jazirat al Maqlab, or “Telegraph Island,” was an active telegraph outpost crucial to communication between India and Britain. For five years after the telegraphy was decommissioned, British soldiers continued to man the isolated outpost. Reportedly, every single man stationed at the outpost “around the bend” of the Musandam peninsula completely lost his mind from the monotony and heat. Stuck for months on the football-field sized island, cut off from the outside world, and subject to intense desert heat, the solders were slowly driven mad. Today the island is a ghostly remnant of the once-great British Empire. The outpost was abandoned in the mid-1870s, and the buildings have crumbled. The island now serves as a snorkeling and fishing destination rather than a strategic communication hub, but the oppressive heat and the lonely atmosphere that helped drive the soldiers “around the bend” remains.
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Day 7

Wadi Tiwi & Wadi Shab

Explore some of Oman’s most stunning wadis on foot. Along the coastal road from Sur to Muscat, Wadi Tiwi is also known as ‘the wadi of nine villages’. Its beauty is best explored on foot, with emerald water pools and date plantations lining the walking routes through the villages. Wadi Shab can only be explored on foot, and reached via a short boat ride (during high tide). The hike into the wadi is not too strenuous and rewards visitors with natural water pools, waterfalls and even a submerged cave.

Al Ansab Wetlands

a protected area

Set in the middle of Muscat, the Al Ansab Wetlands are a protected area and an ornithologists dream. Over 293 species of birds stop over at different times throughout the year, with over 80 resident species.

Muscat: Colours and fragrance fill the air at Al Ansab Wetland where winter sees the best of plants and trees bloom. The wetland has 113 species of Omani trees and shrubs. “The wetland has been there since mid- to late 80s but it was not the way it is now. At that time, may be it was used for treating purposes. Since 2011, The company ( Haya ) started focusing more on it and made a lot of changes. It is now all treated water and therefore you do not have any smell in the wetland areas. “With the addition of shrubs and trees, the area of wetland is attracting more birds. Initially, 150 bird species were reported. Now, it is more than 300.” The wetland has five lagoons, the biggest of which has a depth of four metres. The water, besides attracting birds, also supports greenery. Most of the trees and shrubs are naturally grown. But Haya Water team planted 300 trees to create a forest area, which have all grown and today provide extended shade. In the process, there have been other trees that have sprouted naturally such as banyan trees and date palms. A little further away, adjacent to the nursery of the wetland, the team planted more trees.
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Qurum Beach

clear waters and swaying palm trees

This impressive stretch of sand is a local favourite with its clear waters and swaying palm trees. An array of water sports is on offer to visitors, including jet skiing, banana boating and parasailing, as well as snorkelling and scuba diving excursions. Along the popular coastal road, there are a wide range of restaurants and coffee shops that look out over the beach.

Escape the heat, hustle and bustle of the city and head to the coast. And where better to go than the popular Qurum Beach? Catch some sun on the beautiful sandy beach or lie in the shade of a palm tree. It’s free to enjoy as you wish. Need to cool off? Then submerge yourself in the clear waters of the Gulf of Oman. And once it’s time to rehydrate you’ll find a great choice of cafes and coffee shops close by. Our Hop-on, Hop-off Muscat Bus Tour takes you almost right onto the sand. Then jump back on board for a ride to the neighbouring Mangrove Lagoon. A thriving city beach Located in the upmarket neighbourhood of Qurum - the beating heart of modern Muscat – the beach here is a busy centre of activity. Ride the waves on a jet ski or see and be seen along the coastal road – a classic, scenic strip popular with strolling locals. Other interesting facts about Qurum Beach, Muscat
  • Qurum Beach stretches for four kilometres (2.5 miles) along the Muscat coastline
  • Watersports like jet skiing, parasailing and kayaking can be booked at the Crowne Plaza end of the beach
  • You can also book snorkelling and scuba diving excursions here
  • There’s no great tidal range and waves are small, so bathing is relatively safe at Qurum Beach
  • There’s a good selection of international refreshment and dining options along the coast road
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Oman Children’s Museum

a scientific museum

Set in two distinctive domes in the north of Qurum, the Oman Children’s Museum is a scientific museum that delves into biology, interesting optical illusions, and other interactive displays for children.

The Oman Children's Museum is a children's science museum, located near Qurum Nature Park. The museum was established by the Ministry of National Heritage and Culture and opened on November 17, 1990 by Sultan Qaboos bin Said al Said on the 20th National Day celebration in Oman. The museum has 45 exhibits and two demonstrations and comprises 10,000 square feet (930 m2). It was the first science museum in Oman. The museum has many hands-on displays. These include experiences of a fake electric shock, trigger a lightning bolt, launching a hot air balloon, photographing your own shadow, and sending message through a whisper dish. There is also a display named "Eye Spy", which is series of perception panels with illusions designed to offer some insight into how your eyes and brain see things differently.
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Quriyat

a favourite with bird watchers

The fishing village of Quriyat, en route to Sur, is a favourite with bird watchers. Species such as Kingfishers and Grey Herons are known to frequent the surrounding lagoons.

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  • - 1 Day

    1 Day

    One day may not feel long to experience everything Oman has to offer but with some careful planning and clever selections you can certainly make the most of every minute.

  • - 3 Days

    3 Days

    Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

  • - 7 Days

    7 Days

    If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

  • - 12 Days

    12 Days

    A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.