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3 Day Adventure Itinerary

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Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

Day 1

Daymaniyat Islands

The Daymaniyat Islands are a beautiful marine reserve off the coast of Muscat. There is nothing better than spending the day exploring coral reefs and watching turtle and colourful fish swim past in the azure waters of the islands. The island is also a host to migratory and indigenous birds. The islands are a great location for camping, with the peak camping season being from October to February.

Majlis Al Jinn Cave

requires special permission to visit

One of the largest underground caves in the world, Majlis Al Jinn is a natural wonder located on the Salmah Plateau. In 2007, Austrian sky diver Felix Baumgartner based jumped into the cave, a distance of about 120 metres. Exploring this cave requires a special permission from the Ministry of Tourism Oman.

Majlis al Jinn is one of the largest cave chamber in the world by surface area. The base of the cave is58,000 square meter. The only way to get in is through one of three tiny openings at the top, all of which have been formed over time as the accumulation of rainwater dissolved the limestone covering. This cave chamber, located 60 miles from Muscat, was discovered by Americans Don Davidson Jr. and his wife Cheryl Jones in 1983. They noticed the strange holes in the ground on aerial photographs, and eventually made the journey out via helicopter. When they looked down into the small openings, they saw the sandy floor below - over 500 feet down. Just days later, they rappelled down for the first time. In an attempt to find an appropriate name for the chamber, they asked the Omanis in the surrounding area if they had a local name for it, to which the response was no. They did, however, mention that they believed that the cave was filled with genies, which are prevalent in Omani mythology. In Arabic, the word for “genie” is “al-Jinn”, so hence, the American explorers named the cave is “Majlis al Jinn. “Majlis” means “meeting place,” making the cave name, “the meeting place of the genies.”
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Daymaniyat Islands

Snorkelling and Diving

Located off the coast between Barka and Al Seeb, the Daymaniyat Islands are surrounded by turquoise waters that are perfect for snorkelling and diving. The islands are a protected area, home to endangered sea turtles, untouched coral reefs, and exotic fish.

The main tourist draw between Barka and Sohar is the Sawadi and Daymaniyat islands (and the adjacent Al Sawadi Beach Resort), one of the country’s leading dive spots, but equally rewarding to visit for a snorkel or swim. The rocky and windswept Sawadi Islands lie just offshore. The largest of the seven islands lies almost within spitting distance of the beach, a large rocky hump topped by a string of watchtowers, while the other smaller islands lie further out to sea. It’s possible to walk across the sand to the main island at low tide, though take care you don’t get stranded when the tide comes back in; at other times boat trips can be arranged by bargaining with the local fishermen on the beach for around 5 OR, while snorkelling trips can be set up through Extra Divers at the Al Sawadi Beach Resort. The beach here is littered with exotic-looking seashells, perfect for a stroll and a spot of beachcombing.
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Bait Al Baranda

historical displays from across the ages

Bait Al Baranda is located in Muttrah in what used to be the residence of a prominent merchant in the early 20th century. Exhibits include art and historical displays from across the ages.

Converted from a 1930s house, this museum details the history of Oman and the Muscat region. Covering topics from the geology of the country and plate tectonics to Oman’s military and political history, a visit to Bait Al-Baranda (translates to ‘villa with a verandah’) is a great way to get an overview of Omani culture and tradition. Multimedia exhibits include interactive screens and videos as well as a photo history and a variety of art and posters on display. There are models of and artifacts from ancient Oman. Tracing history back to prehistoric Oman, the exhibits tells of the country’s early Islamic period, Portuguese occupation and current dynasty. A presentation of dinosaurs’ bones found 10,000 years ago in the Al-Khoud area is particularly noteworthy.
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Al Ansab Wetlands

a protected area

Set in the middle of Muscat, the Al Ansab Wetlands are a protected area and an ornithologists dream. Over 293 species of birds stop over at different times throughout the year, with over 80 resident species.

Muscat: Colours and fragrance fill the air at Al Ansab Wetland where winter sees the best of plants and trees bloom. The wetland has 113 species of Omani trees and shrubs. “The wetland has been there since mid- to late 80s but it was not the way it is now. At that time, may be it was used for treating purposes. Since 2011, The company ( Haya ) started focusing more on it and made a lot of changes. It is now all treated water and therefore you do not have any smell in the wetland areas. “With the addition of shrubs and trees, the area of wetland is attracting more birds. Initially, 150 bird species were reported. Now, it is more than 300.” The wetland has five lagoons, the biggest of which has a depth of four metres. The water, besides attracting birds, also supports greenery. Most of the trees and shrubs are naturally grown. But Haya Water team planted 300 trees to create a forest area, which have all grown and today provide extended shade. In the process, there have been other trees that have sprouted naturally such as banyan trees and date palms. A little further away, adjacent to the nursery of the wetland, the team planted more trees.
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Day 2

A’Sharqiyah Sands

Located about a three-hour drive from Muscat, the Sharqiyah Sands are a beautiful expanse of desert. This region in Oman is very popular for desert safaris, quad biking and more. What better way to explore the desert than on the back of a camel or in the comfort of a 4WD vehicle. End the day by setting up a campsite or booking a desert camp where a night under the glittering night sky is always a special experience.

Ras Al Jinz

A famous nature reserve

Thousands of sea turtles migrate yearly to the shores of Oman to lay their eggs. Ras Al Jinz is a nature reserve famous for the opportunity to witness the endangered green sea turtle in its natural habitat during nesting and hatching season.

Ras Al Jinz Turtle Reserve, a unique natural landscape, unspoiled shorelines, golden deserts, luxuriant green oases and rugged mountains. Ras Al Jinz is world renown for the nesting of the endangered green turtle (Cheloniamydas), probably the most important nesting concentration on the Indian Ocean. This is the only place where public can watch the nesting process of these amazing sea-giants. A once in a lifetime opportunity.
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Jalan Bani Bu Hassan

A must-visit when in Ash Sharqiyah

In the past Jalan Bani Bu Ali and Bani Bu Hassan were neighbouring rivals, today both settlements flow into each other amongst the date palm plantations. Jalan Bani Bu Hassan Fort is one of the oldest in the region and a must-visit when in Ash Sharqiyah.

Jalan Bani Bu Hassan, a wilayat in the Sharqiyah South Governorate, is located 300 kilometres away from Muscat. It borders Al Kamil W’al Wafi in the north, Sur in the northeast, Bidiya in the west, Mahout in the southwest and Jaalan Bani Bu Ali in the south. The wilayat comprises 197 villages that are reputed for geographical diversification and several of archaeological, historical, tourist and economic landmarks.
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Sharqiyah Sands

experience the desert first hand

The Sharqiyah Sands allows visitors to experience the desert first hand, with dunes reaching as far as the horizon and the area teeming with wildlife. Dune bashing is one of the many favourite activities for visitors to the Sharqiyah Sands.

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Sur Maritime Museum

Oman’s rich seafaring heritage

Showcasing Oman’s maritime history and traditional boatbuilding craftsmanship, the Sur Maritime Museum bears testament to the trade that marks Oman’s rich seafaring heritage. The famous, original Fatah Al Khair dhow is displayed here.

Sur City is famous for its maritime heritage, which highlights the leading role that Omanis played in maritime navigation across a long period in history. In order to preserve this heritage, and to ensure that the coming generations know of it, the Maritime Museum in the Wilayat of Sur was established to reflect various types of Omani maritime heritage. Efforts have been made by the citizens of the wilayat and researchers in Omani heritage to preserve this slice of history. The Museum was established in 1987 at the Al Orouba Club. Since its inception, it has been serving a scientific cause for the benefit of those interested in the Omani maritime history. The museum includes several sections. The emblem of the wilaya ‘Al Ghanja Ship’ is located at the entrance of the museum. In the middle of the ship section, there are different types of Omani ships. The visitors can see images of famous makers of ships, locally called Al Wistad, in addition to images of a number of sailors and captains of ships locally called “Nokhidha,” as well as photos of ports visited by those ships.
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Day 3

Jebel Al Akhdar

As one of Oman’s highest points, Jebel Al Akhdar offers a day of fun exploration in a truly unique spot in the Arabian Peninsula. Enjoy the cool climate up in the mountains. Jebel Al Akhdar has numerous hiking trails, some passing mountain villages, others through wadis and abandoned settlements which overlook a spectacular landscape of dramatic terrace, peaks, gorges and wadis.

Bait Al Baranda

historical displays from across the ages

Bait Al Baranda is located in Muttrah in what used to be the residence of a prominent merchant in the early 20th century. Exhibits include art and historical displays from across the ages.

Converted from a 1930s house, this museum details the history of Oman and the Muscat region. Covering topics from the geology of the country and plate tectonics to Oman’s military and political history, a visit to Bait Al-Baranda (translates to ‘villa with a verandah’) is a great way to get an overview of Omani culture and tradition. Multimedia exhibits include interactive screens and videos as well as a photo history and a variety of art and posters on display. There are models of and artifacts from ancient Oman. Tracing history back to prehistoric Oman, the exhibits tells of the country’s early Islamic period, Portuguese occupation and current dynasty. A presentation of dinosaurs’ bones found 10,000 years ago in the Al-Khoud area is particularly noteworthy.
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Salut Ruins

Dating back to the beginning of Oman’s settlement

Near the village of Bisyah, Salut’s historical significance is manifold, dating back to the beginning of Oman’s settlement. The ruins, which comprise of a castle, a beehive tomb like those found in Bat and Shir and a temple-like structure, are only partially restored at this point.

The historical significance of Salut is directly connected with the dawn of the Omani history, which first saw the light with the arrival of Arab tribes in Oman from different regions of the Arabian Peninsula. This site is witness to the beginning of settlements in Oman. Salut Archaeological Site is located on top of a rocky hill in A’Dakhiliyah Governorate. Ruins have been found that date back to the Iron Age between the period 1,400 to 600 BC. There is no doubt that the location of Salut is one of the most important sites containing ruins that help explore the Iron Age, whose development in the eastern Arabian Peninsula is still not well understood . From a historical and archaeological perspective, the site is noted for its fortified buildings and architectural style which is impressive for that era, in addition to the use of the Falaj Irrigation System.
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Wadi Tiwi

best explored on foot

Not far from Wadi Shab is Wadi Tiwi, which is lined by small villages and date and banana plantations. Although the wadi can be accessed by car, it is best explored on foot, with a two-day hike possible across the mountains to Wadi Bani Khalid.

A couple of kilometres south of Wadi Shab lies the almost identical Wadi Tiwi, another spectacularly deep and narrow gorge carved out of the mountains, running between towering cliffs right down to the sea. It’s less unspoiled than Wadi Shab surrounded by lush plantations of date and banana, and criss-crossed with a network of gurgling aflaj.
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Jebel Samhan Nature Reserve

See wild Arabian Leopards

A special permission is required to visit the Jebel Samham Nature Reserve, which is home to some of the last wild Arabian Leopards and other rare species such as the Arabian Wolf and Striped Hyena. The road leading to the reserve, however, is rewarding on its own right, passing large baobab trees and traditional Jeballi settlements to Jebel Samham’s breath-taking escarpment.

Jabal Samhan Nature Reserve is a nature reserve in the area of Jabal Samḥān (Arabic: جَـبَـل سَـمْـحَـان‎, "Mount Samhan") in Dhofar. It has an area of 4,500 square kilometres (1,700 sq mi) and has no permanent population. Being in the region of the Dhofar Mountains, it is one of the last refuges for wild Arabian leopards. The most important prey species are Arabian gazelle, Nubian ibex, Cape hare, rock hyrax, Indian crested porcupine, desert hedgehog and several bird species.
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  • 1 Day
  • 3 Days
  • 7 Days
  • 12 Days
  • - 1 Day

    1 Day

    One day may not feel long to experience everything Oman has to offer but with some careful planning and clever selections you can certainly make the most of every minute.

  • - 3 Days

    3 Days

    Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

  • - 7 Days

    7 Days

    If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

  • - 12 Days

    12 Days

    A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.