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3 Day Adventure Itinerary

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Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

Day 1

Daymaniyat Islands

The Daymaniyat Islands are a beautiful marine reserve off the coast of Muscat. There is nothing better than spending the day exploring coral reefs and watching turtle and colourful fish swim past in the azure waters of the islands. The island is also a host to migratory and indigenous birds. The islands are a great location for camping, with the peak camping season being from October to February.

Bait Al Baranda

historical displays from across the ages

Bait Al Baranda is located in Muttrah in what used to be the residence of a prominent merchant in the early 20th century. Exhibits include art and historical displays from across the ages.

Converted from a 1930s house, this museum details the history of Oman and the Muscat region. Covering topics from the geology of the country and plate tectonics to Oman’s military and political history, a visit to Bait Al-Baranda (translates to ‘villa with a verandah’) is a great way to get an overview of Omani culture and tradition. Multimedia exhibits include interactive screens and videos as well as a photo history and a variety of art and posters on display. There are models of and artifacts from ancient Oman. Tracing history back to prehistoric Oman, the exhibits tells of the country’s early Islamic period, Portuguese occupation and current dynasty. A presentation of dinosaurs’ bones found 10,000 years ago in the Al-Khoud area is particularly noteworthy.
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Oil and Gas Exhibition Centre

Learn about the oil and gas industry

The Oman Oil and Gas Exhibition Centre highlights the journey of the discovery, extraction, and use of fossil fuels in Oman through interactive displays.

Established in 1995 under Petroleum Development Oman (PDO), the centre particularly appeals to visitors interested in learning about the oil and gas industry and how it has contributed to the growth of infrastructure throughout Oman.

The PDO planetarium lies adjacent to the centre and boasts a “full dome” digital system to teach kids and adults about astronomy in an engaging way.

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Muscat Gate Museum

One of the most photographed landmarks

One of the most photographed landmarks in the Sultanate, this museum is set over a road that marks the entrance into Old Muscat. Visitors can view general and historic information about Oman and enjoy stunning views of Muttrah corniche from the terrace.

Spanning the road between the old walled city of Muscat and the Corniche nestles the Muscat Gate Museum. The museum transport visitors to a different world, an enriching journey of the emergence and evolution of the Sultanate of Oman, also stands testament to Muscat’s history and artifacts. The gates of the museum formerly marked Muscat city’s boundary for the city was once enclosed within the fortified walls. The gateway was used until 1970 to keep intruders out of the walled vicinity. Though the museum houses limited exhibits, it is more popular for being an excellent vantage point offering breathtaking vistas of the Diwan and the Corniche. Once you are done exploring the historical artifacts, take a drive up to the aerial mast to the neighboring hillock to enjoy a panoramic view of the Muttrah area and the Muscat city before it merges with the horizon of the Al Riyam Park.
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Muttrah Souq and Fish Market

Highlights of this historic waterfront

Located close to each other along Muttrah’s scenic corniche, Muttrah Souq and Fish Market are the highlights of this historic waterfront. Early each morning, local fishermen sell their fresh catch at the fish market and Muttrah Souq is the perfect place to barter for traditional silver jewellery, Frankincense, fabrics and many more unique souvenirs.

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Day 2

A’Sharqiyah Sands

Located about a three-hour drive from Muscat, the Sharqiyah Sands are a beautiful expanse of desert. This region in Oman is very popular for desert safaris, quad biking and more. What better way to explore the desert than on the back of a camel or in the comfort of a 4WD vehicle. End the day by setting up a campsite or booking a desert camp where a night under the glittering night sky is always a special experience.

Ibra

A modern city

Once a trading hub at the gates to the Sharqiyah Sands, Ibra today is a modern city complete with university, hospital and hotels. Its many forts and mosques are some of the oldest in Oman, with Al Minzifah and the Wednesday Women’s Market just some of the must-see highlights.

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Wadi Tiwi

best explored on foot

Not far from Wadi Shab is Wadi Tiwi, which is lined by small villages and date and banana plantations. Although the wadi can be accessed by car, it is best explored on foot, with a two-day hike possible across the mountains to Wadi Bani Khalid.

A couple of kilometres south of Wadi Shab lies the almost identical Wadi Tiwi, another spectacularly deep and narrow gorge carved out of the mountains, running between towering cliffs right down to the sea. It’s less unspoiled than Wadi Shab surrounded by lush plantations of date and banana, and criss-crossed with a network of gurgling aflaj.
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Wadi Shab

A famous waterfall and crystal clear water pools,

Located just off the Sur-Muscat coastal road, Wadi Shab can be reached via a short boat ride. A short hike will bring visitors to the wadi’s famous waterfall and crystal clear water pools, and even a partially submerged cave.

Visiting Wadi Shab is one of the top things to do in Oman and you need to include it on your list. Think a fantastic gorge, warm blue pools, and a hidden waterfall!
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Sharqiyah Sands

experience the desert first hand

The Sharqiyah Sands allows visitors to experience the desert first hand, with dunes reaching as far as the horizon and the area teeming with wildlife. Dune bashing is one of the many favourite activities for visitors to the Sharqiyah Sands.

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Day 3

Jebel Al Akhdar

As one of Oman’s highest points, Jebel Al Akhdar offers a day of fun exploration in a truly unique spot in the Arabian Peninsula. Enjoy the cool climate up in the mountains. Jebel Al Akhdar has numerous hiking trails, some passing mountain villages, others through wadis and abandoned settlements which overlook a spectacular landscape of dramatic terrace, peaks, gorges and wadis.

Al Shu’ir Beach

Soft white sand and an eternal light breeze

El Shuyr Beach is just a few minutes drive from Al-Dukma and, like all beaches in the area, has soft white sand and an eternal light breeze. Around are houses of fishermen, which indicates that this area is also great for fishing.

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Al Alam Palace, Al Jalali and Al Mirani Forts

Located in the heart of Old Muscat

The ceremonial palace of His Majesty Sultan Qaboos bin Said, Al Alam Palace was rebuilt as a royal residence in 1972 and is located in the heart of Old Muscat. It is flanked on either side by the impressive twin Jalali and Mirani Forts originally built by the Portuguese in the 16th century. Both of these majestic buildings are still in use, and although they are not open to the public, tourists can admire the architecture from the yard and at the gates.

At the heart of Old Muscat is Al Alam Palace (“Flag Palace”), the most important of the six royal residences of the ruling monarch, Sultan Qaboos, which are dotted around Muscat, Salalah and Sohar. Built in 1972, the palace is Oman’s most flamboyant example of contemporary Islamic design, with two long wings centred on a colourful, cube-like central building, its flat, overhanging roof supported by extravagantly flared blue and gold columns. The palace isn’t open to the public, although you can get a good view of the facade from the iron gates at the front. The palace complex is impressively stage-managed, approached via a long pedestrianized boulevard framed by two arcaded colonnades, with copious amounts of highly polished marble covering every available surface. On either side stretches a cluster of impressive government buildings: huge, snow-white edifices sporting crenellated rooftops, traditional wooden balconies and window shutters. Look right as you approach the palace and you’ll also see a fine section of the original city walls snaking up the hillside, punctuated with three large watchtowers en route.
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Qurum Beach

clear waters and swaying palm trees

This impressive stretch of sand is a local favourite with its clear waters and swaying palm trees. An array of water sports is on offer to visitors, including jet skiing, banana boating and parasailing, as well as snorkelling and scuba diving excursions. Along the popular coastal road, there are a wide range of restaurants and coffee shops that look out over the beach.

Escape the heat, hustle and bustle of the city and head to the coast. And where better to go than the popular Qurum Beach? Catch some sun on the beautiful sandy beach or lie in the shade of a palm tree. It’s free to enjoy as you wish. Need to cool off? Then submerge yourself in the clear waters of the Gulf of Oman. And once it’s time to rehydrate you’ll find a great choice of cafes and coffee shops close by. Our Hop-on, Hop-off Muscat Bus Tour takes you almost right onto the sand. Then jump back on board for a ride to the neighbouring Mangrove Lagoon. A thriving city beach Located in the upmarket neighbourhood of Qurum - the beating heart of modern Muscat – the beach here is a busy centre of activity. Ride the waves on a jet ski or see and be seen along the coastal road – a classic, scenic strip popular with strolling locals. Other interesting facts about Qurum Beach, Muscat
  • Qurum Beach stretches for four kilometres (2.5 miles) along the Muscat coastline
  • Watersports like jet skiing, parasailing and kayaking can be booked at the Crowne Plaza end of the beach
  • You can also book snorkelling and scuba diving excursions here
  • There’s no great tidal range and waves are small, so bathing is relatively safe at Qurum Beach
  • There’s a good selection of international refreshment and dining options along the coast road
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Samharam – Khawr Ruri

A UNESCO World Heritage Site

Set in Dhofar’s largest nature reserve, the ruins of Samharam are part of the Land of Frankincense UNESCO World Heritage Site. The port played an important part in trade over 2000 years ago. Overlooking Khawr Ruri, the history of the settlement and port is showcased at the on-site museum. The Queen of Sheba is said to have once had a palace at Samharam.

Khor Rorī (Arabic: خور روري‎) is an ancient south Arabian archaeological site near Salalah. The fortified city was founded as main port for Frankincense trade at the end of the first century BC, initially it was founded primarily with defensive function then developed later into a city in the first century AD. The foundation of the city by the king of Hardamaut is closely associated with rising importance of sea trade at the end of the first century BC between the Mediterranean and India. In this period, the Hadrami kingdom was economically and politically dependent on its ability to control the coastal region. History Inscriptions at Khor Rori report that the town of Sumhuram was founded on royal initiative and settled by Hadhrami emigrants. The Dhofar region was the main source of frankincense in the ancient period, and it seems likely that the foundation of the settlement by the Hadhramaut was in part motivated by wish to control the production of this valuable commodity. Most scholars identify Khor Rori with the frankincense exporting port of Moscha Limen mentioned in this region in the first century CE merchants guide, the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea.
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  • 1 Day
  • 3 Days
  • 7 Days
  • 12 Days
  • - 1 Day

    1 Day

    One day may not feel long to experience everything Oman has to offer but with some careful planning and clever selections you can certainly make the most of every minute.

  • - 3 Days

    3 Days

    Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

  • - 7 Days

    7 Days

    If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

  • - 12 Days

    12 Days

    A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.