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12 Day Culture Itinerary

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A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.

Day 1

Muscat

Oman’s capital has a lot to offer for those seeking to learn more about Omani culture and heritage. First, visit the Royal Opera House Muscat which is open for guided tours in the morning – or visit in the evening when the venue hosts shows and its stunning beauty and musical ambitions of this architectural marvel truly shine. Muscat has many interesting museums and galleries worth exploring. The National Museum in Old Muscat recently opened to the public and with magnificent exhibits and stunning location is a must when in the city. Bait Al Zubair not far away is a former residence-turned-museum, filled with artefacts from Oman’s history. Other museums include the Children’s Museum, the Natural History Museum, Omani French Museum and more.

Bird Watching in Quriyat

a favourite with bird watchers

The fishing village of Quriyat, en route to Sur, is a favourite with bird watchers. Species such as kingfishers and grey herons are known to frequent the surrounding lagoons.

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Amouage Factory

Amouage is a world-renowned luxury fragrance brand

Founded over a quarter of a century ago, Amouage is a world-renowned luxury fragrance brand with origins in the Sultanate. In the Amouage Factory, visitors can get behind the scenes and garner an insight into the creation of some of the world’s most exclusive scents.

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Quriyat

a favourite with bird watchers

The fishing village of Quriyat, en route to Sur, is a favourite with bird watchers. Species such as Kingfishers and Grey Herons are known to frequent the surrounding lagoons.

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Muscat Gate Museum

One of the most photographed landmarks

One of the most photographed landmarks in the Sultanate, this museum is set over a road that marks the entrance into Old Muscat. Visitors can view general and historic information about Oman and enjoy stunning views of Muttrah corniche from the terrace.

Spanning the road between the old walled city of Muscat and the Corniche nestles the Muscat Gate Museum. The museum transport visitors to a different world, an enriching journey of the emergence and evolution of the Sultanate of Oman, also stands testament to Muscat’s history and artifacts. The gates of the museum formerly marked Muscat city’s boundary for the city was once enclosed within the fortified walls. The gateway was used until 1970 to keep intruders out of the walled vicinity. Though the museum houses limited exhibits, it is more popular for being an excellent vantage point offering breathtaking vistas of the Diwan and the Corniche. Once you are done exploring the historical artifacts, take a drive up to the aerial mast to the neighboring hillock to enjoy a panoramic view of the Muttrah area and the Muscat city before it merges with the horizon of the Al Riyam Park.
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muscat

Day 2

Old Muscat

The old part of Muscat, with its traditional architecture and rich history, is the perfect place to continue a cultural holiday. Al Alam – the ceremonial palace of His Majesty Sultan Qaboos – is nestled in the heart of Old Muscat, flanked by the Al Mirani and Al Jalali Forts on either side and facing a secluded bay. Re-built in the 1970s, the palace is the Sultan’s official representative palace, where he welcomes dignitaries and world leaders. Parts of the first tarmac road to ever be built in Oman still exists today and can be viewed along the old Riyam to Muscat Road. Expect some stunning views of Old Muscat, including a great view of the Sultan’s Palace. Muttrah’s corniche is a great place to visit, especially at night. Muttrah Souq is one of the oldest in Arabia and is the perfect place to barter for souvenirs.

Camping – Fins

a coastal village

Only a short drive from Bimmah Sinkhole, Fins is a coastal village mainly known for its hidden beaches and coves framed by white sands, turquoise waters and the Al Hajar Mountains as backdrop. Perfect for a memorable camping experience.

It’s legal to wild camp in Oman. And, done responsibly, it’s one of the most rewarding ways to take in the country’s varied terrain.
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Muscat Gate Museum

One of the most photographed landmarks

One of the most photographed landmarks in the Sultanate, this museum is set over a road that marks the entrance into Old Muscat. Visitors can view general and historic information about Oman and enjoy stunning views of Muttrah corniche from the terrace.

Spanning the road between the old walled city of Muscat and the Corniche nestles the Muscat Gate Museum. The museum transport visitors to a different world, an enriching journey of the emergence and evolution of the Sultanate of Oman, also stands testament to Muscat’s history and artifacts. The gates of the museum formerly marked Muscat city’s boundary for the city was once enclosed within the fortified walls. The gateway was used until 1970 to keep intruders out of the walled vicinity. Though the museum houses limited exhibits, it is more popular for being an excellent vantage point offering breathtaking vistas of the Diwan and the Corniche. Once you are done exploring the historical artifacts, take a drive up to the aerial mast to the neighboring hillock to enjoy a panoramic view of the Muttrah area and the Muscat city before it merges with the horizon of the Al Riyam Park.
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Royal Opera House Muscat

A beautiful example of modern Omani architecture

The Royal Opera House Muscat hosts world-class shows and brings artists from around the world to Oman, including ballet, operas, musicals and more. Luxury shopping and fine dining is available at the Opera Galleria next door.

Royal Opera House Muscat is the leading arts and culture organization in the Sultanate of Oman.The vision of the Opera House is to serve as a centre of excellence in global cultural engagement. We strive to enrich lives through diverse artistic, cultural, and educational programs. The multidisciplinary work of Royal Opera House Muscat showcases rich and diverse artistic creations from Oman, the region, and the world; provides a space for culture and socioeconomic development reflections and actions; inspires audiences and nurtures creativity with innovative programs; fosters cultural vitality and unleashes talent; promotes cultural tourism; and puts cultural diplomacy into practice by reinvigorating global and multi-disciplinary collaborations and exchanges.
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Quriyat

a favourite with bird watchers

The fishing village of Quriyat, en route to Sur, is a favourite with bird watchers. Species such as Kingfishers and Grey Herons are known to frequent the surrounding lagoons.

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SUR RAS JINZ

Day 3

Sur

Located about two hours from Muscat along a scenic coastal road, the city of Sur still upholds the age-old tradition of Dhow building and maritime culture. The last remaining Dhow factory gives tourists the unique chance to see Dhows being built without plan – according to ancient traditions. Close to the Dhow factory is the Sur Maritime Museum, where this ancient art of Dhow building and Oman’s maritime culture are further explained. Built by the Portuguese to assist boats to come into the lagoon, the neighbourhood of Al Ayjah is rich in history and home to the Al Ayjah lighthouse. In the past, residents had to take boats to reach the other side, today a bridge spans across the water. Spot the beautiful old merchant houses during a walk around.

Yiti Beach

Frequented by locals as well as tourists

The Yiti Beach, located beyond the village of Yiti, is a small beach - about one kilometre long - that can be easily reached by car. Frequented by locals as well as tourists, it is a great spot to enjoy barbecues, camping, and fishing.

Jagged rocks formed by sea salt winds and waves stick out of the Sea of Oman creating the sheltered bay of Yiti Beach. Just 28-kilometres from the centre of Muscat, the beach is known as a place of solitude and relaxation – an escape from the hectic city. The sand takes on an orange hue and the water changes to a deeper blue as the sun sets and the light changes. Lay on the rocks overlooking the beach at twilight or find an area along the strip of soft sand.
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Oil and Gas Exhibition Centre

Learn about the oil and gas industry

The Oman Oil and Gas Exhibition Centre highlights the journey of the discovery, extraction, and use of fossil fuels in Oman through interactive displays.

Established in 1995 under Petroleum Development Oman (PDO), the centre particularly appeals to visitors interested in learning about the oil and gas industry and how it has contributed to the growth of infrastructure throughout Oman.

The PDO planetarium lies adjacent to the centre and boasts a “full dome” digital system to teach kids and adults about astronomy in an engaging way.

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Omani French Museum

Established by His Majesty, Sultan Qaboos bin Said

Honouring the close relationship Oman and France have enjoyed for centuries, the Omani French Museum was established by His Majesty, Sultan Qaboos bin Said and former French President, the late François Mitterrand in 1992. It is housed in Bait Faransa, the former residence of a French consul in Old Muscat.

With galleries detailing relations between the two countries, this museum provides an interesting snapshot of mostly 19th-century colonial life in Muscat. Of particular interest are a series of old photographs and maps documenting the capital in the last century. There's also a Paris map showing the itinerary of His Majesty Sultan Qaboos during his state visit in 1989.
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Bait Al Zubair

A prominent landmark of Old Muscat

Once a private residence, the owner’s family have since turned Bait Al Zubair into a prominent landmark of Old Muscat. From art to photography and traditional artefacts from daily life, the museum is a must for everyone interested in learning more about the Sultanate’s heritage.

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SHARQIYAH

Day 4

A’Sharqiyah Sands

About 115km west of Sur lies the edge of the Sharqiyah Sands. The desert awaits! A favourite with locals and visitors alike, Wadi Bani Khalid is the perfect place to enjoy a refreshing swim in its natural pools. Since many villages are nestled around the wadi, visitors are asked to dress modestly at all times. The A’Sharqiyah Sands has a number of desert camps, from traditional to luxurious, that welcome visitors for an overnight stay. Often this is combined with a camel ride, dune driving or meeting a Bedouin family.

Ras Al Jinz

A famous nature reserve

Thousands of sea turtles migrate yearly to the shores of Oman to lay their eggs. Ras Al Jinz is a nature reserve famous for the opportunity to witness the endangered green sea turtle in its natural habitat during nesting and hatching season.

Ras Al Jinz Turtle Reserve, a unique natural landscape, unspoiled shorelines, golden deserts, luxuriant green oases and rugged mountains. Ras Al Jinz is world renown for the nesting of the endangered green turtle (Cheloniamydas), probably the most important nesting concentration on the Indian Ocean. This is the only place where public can watch the nesting process of these amazing sea-giants. A once in a lifetime opportunity.
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Bidiyah

At the edge of the Sharqiyah Sands

Located 233km from Muscat, Bidiyah is a collection of villages at the edge of the Sharqiyah Sands. Home to Bedouin people from the desert, it is the perfect place to experience traditional camel or horse races or visit its famous Eid market.

A three- to four-hour drive from Muscat, Bidiyah is in the Sharqiyah Sands, the most popular destination in Oman for dune-bashing, desert-crossings, and camping. No visit to Oman would be complete without seeing these spectacular seas of sand.
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Jalan Bani Bu Hassan

A must-visit when in Ash Sharqiyah

In the past Jalan Bani Bu Ali and Bani Bu Hassan were neighbouring rivals, today both settlements flow into each other amongst the date palm plantations. Jalan Bani Bu Hassan Fort is one of the oldest in the region and a must-visit when in Ash Sharqiyah.

Jalan Bani Bu Hassan, a wilayat in the Sharqiyah South Governorate, is located 300 kilometres away from Muscat. It borders Al Kamil W’al Wafi in the north, Sur in the northeast, Bidiya in the west, Mahout in the southwest and Jaalan Bani Bu Ali in the south. The wilayat comprises 197 villages that are reputed for geographical diversification and several of archaeological, historical, tourist and economic landmarks.
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Jalan Bani Bu Ali

A town steeped in history with old watchtowers

Jalan Bani Bu Ali is a town steeped in history with old watchtowers, an old fort and ornate carved wooden doors at every turn. However, it is most famous for the souq, which is open every Friday morning and sells a variety of modern and traditional goods.

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nizwa

Day 5

Jabreen Castle, Bahla Fort & Nizwa

Today’s destination is the city of Nizwa, but first a stop at one of Oman’s most beautiful castles plus the Sultanate’s largest fort. Jabreen Castle was built in the 17th century and commands panoramic views of the surroundings date plantations. Over three stories tall, the castle was once a private residence, not a fortification, and its intricate ceilings and clever layout are still a sight to behold. Bahla Fort is Oman’s largest fort and also a UNESCO World Heritage Site, having been restored in accordance with the ancient methods since 1987. Next is Nizwa, and like Muscat the city holds a sprawling souq. Nearby is one of Oman’s most famous forts, Nizwa Fort.

Jebel Samhan Nature Reserve

See wild Arabian Leopards

A special permission is required to visit the Jebel Samham Nature Reserve, which is home to some of the last wild Arabian Leopards and other rare species such as the Arabian Wolf and Striped Hyena. The road leading to the reserve, however, is rewarding on its own right, passing large baobab trees and traditional Jeballi settlements to Jebel Samham’s breath-taking escarpment.

Jabal Samhan Nature Reserve is a nature reserve in the area of Jabal Samḥān (Arabic: جَـبَـل سَـمْـحَـان‎, "Mount Samhan") in Dhofar. It has an area of 4,500 square kilometres (1,700 sq mi) and has no permanent population. Being in the region of the Dhofar Mountains, it is one of the last refuges for wild Arabian leopards. The most important prey species are Arabian gazelle, Nubian ibex, Cape hare, rock hyrax, Indian crested porcupine, desert hedgehog and several bird species.
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Duqm Rock Garden

Feels like stepping onto another planet

Located about 550km from Muscat, visiting this geographical marvel feels like stepping onto another planet. Limestone and sandstone rock formations eroded by wind and weather cover a large area. Look closely and you might even be able to spot fossils.

Whichever way you approach this place, you’re likely to have traveled through hundreds of kilometers of rocky desert. It is, therefore, somewhat surprising to find 3 square km of desert fenced off and signposted “Rock Garden.” If you leave behind any preconceived ideas of what a garden may look like, and focus instead on the rock part of the name, you’ll be better prepared for the site. At first sight, there is little (if any) difference between the fenced off and the surrounding area. Yet, once you start wandering around, you’ll find a curious array of sandstone and limestone formations. Water, wind and millions of years combined managed to create this bizarre landscape. Almost perfectly spherical stones sit next to rocks resembling animals, thrones, human body parts, and whatever else your imagination can conjure up. Some large rocks stand balanced on smaller ones, while others sit at improbable angles. It may not be the most jaw-dropping site you’ll ever see, but it does provide the chance to marvel at the beauty of rocks. There is something hypnotic about contemplating the way time has made some rocks smooth, and others jagged, some flaky and others scaly, and so on. If you take time to notice these little variations, the Rock Garden has a striking variety of rock surfaces, shapes, and colors.
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Sur Maritime Museum

Oman’s rich seafaring heritage

Showcasing Oman’s maritime history and traditional boatbuilding craftsmanship, the Sur Maritime Museum bears testament to the trade that marks Oman’s rich seafaring heritage. The famous, original Fatah Al Khair dhow is displayed here.

Sur City is famous for its maritime heritage, which highlights the leading role that Omanis played in maritime navigation across a long period in history. In order to preserve this heritage, and to ensure that the coming generations know of it, the Maritime Museum in the Wilayat of Sur was established to reflect various types of Omani maritime heritage. Efforts have been made by the citizens of the wilayat and researchers in Omani heritage to preserve this slice of history. The Museum was established in 1987 at the Al Orouba Club. Since its inception, it has been serving a scientific cause for the benefit of those interested in the Omani maritime history. The museum includes several sections. The emblem of the wilaya ‘Al Ghanja Ship’ is located at the entrance of the museum. In the middle of the ship section, there are different types of Omani ships. The visitors can see images of famous makers of ships, locally called Al Wistad, in addition to images of a number of sailors and captains of ships locally called “Nokhidha,” as well as photos of ports visited by those ships.
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Bait Al Baranda

historical displays from across the ages

Bait Al Baranda is located in Muttrah in what used to be the residence of a prominent merchant in the early 20th century. Exhibits include art and historical displays from across the ages.

Converted from a 1930s house, this museum details the history of Oman and the Muscat region. Covering topics from the geology of the country and plate tectonics to Oman’s military and political history, a visit to Bait Al-Baranda (translates to ‘villa with a verandah’) is a great way to get an overview of Omani culture and tradition. Multimedia exhibits include interactive screens and videos as well as a photo history and a variety of art and posters on display. There are models of and artifacts from ancient Oman. Tracing history back to prehistoric Oman, the exhibits tells of the country’s early Islamic period, Portuguese occupation and current dynasty. A presentation of dinosaurs’ bones found 10,000 years ago in the Al-Khoud area is particularly noteworthy.
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Al Jebel Al Akhdar

Day 6

Al Jebel Al Akhdar

Amongst the highest peaks in the Hajar Mountain range, Jebel Al Akhdar boasts spectacular views and cooler temperatures. Jebel Al Akhdar’s green terrace fields include rose bushes that bloom in March every year. It is then that local entrepreneurs distil rose water from the blossoms, an ancient tradition that visitors are welcome to observe. There are several hiking and off-roading trails across the mountain top that that can be explored. Wadi Bani Habib, with its abandoned villages, is especially interesting for visitors.

Village of Al Roos
It is an old village located on a slope of Al Jebel Al Akhdar and includes a meeting room "Majlis" and a number of mud houses.
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Wadi Bani Habib
One of the famous wadis in Al Jebel Al Akhdar, this Wadi can be explored on foot. It is surrounded on all sides with green walnut groves and some local bushes widely scattered. It also the home to the abandoned village of Bani Habib, which welcomes visitors who are trekking and exploration lovers.
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Village of Sayq
Although it was formerly one of the difficult places that has access problems in Oman, the village of Sayq is one of the agricultural wonders in the Sultanate of Oman, which contains orchards full of fruits, it also provides its visitors an interesting view of the nearby wadis, and is the perfect place for camping or accommodation in one of the fancy hotels.
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Sohar Souq
Overlooking the Sea of Oman, the new historic Sohar Souq is less than 300 meters north of Sohar Fort. Arabic decorations and exquisite interiors give a shine to the Souq that you can visit whenever you come to Sohar. Various cafes are located in both the ground floor and upstairs.
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AL HAMRA TOMBS OF AL AYN

Day 7

Al Hamra & Tombs of Al Ayn

Moving down the mountain and further inland, this day features a visit to one of Oman’s most scenic old towns plus another UNESCO World Heritage Site. Nestled at the foot of the Al Hajar Mountains, Al Hamra has numerous mudbrick buildings making up its old centre. Best explored on foot, the settlement includes Bait Al Safah – a museum where locals show visitors first-hand the daily household routine of a traditional Omani house. A short drive up the mountain from Ibri are the beehive tombs of Al Ayn and Bat, both of which form part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site. They are the most complete collection of settlements and necropolises from the 3rd Millennium BC in the world, so are definitely worth the two-hour drive from Al Hamra.

Al Ayn and Bat Beehive Tombs

A must-see attraction

A must-see attraction in the A'Dhahirah region, the Al Ayn and Bat Beehive Tombs are not only recognised as a UNESCO World Heritage site, but also boast the title of the most complete collection of necropolises and settlements in the world, dating back to the 3rd Millennium BC.

More than 100 tombs stand defiantly on the hilltops of Northern Oman, all shaped like beehives. Little is known about the tombs, or the culture that constructed them, but they are thought to date from 3000 to 2000 B.C.E. All together they form one of the largest protohistoric necropoleis in the world. It is a bit difficult to spot the tombs at first, since they merge harmoniously with the hills they were built on, but upon closer inspection they are easily spotted. The tombs are arranged in three main clusters, the one in Bat, which is arguably the most famous, as well as the sites of al-Ayn and al-Khutm. The best preserved tombs of the site are the ones of the al-Ayn grouping.
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Oman Natural History Museum

Located at the Ministry of Heritage and Culture

The Oman Natural History Museum provides a fascinating insight into the geological heritage of the Sultanate and its impressive flora and fauna, with displays of mammals, insects and birds as well as a beautiful botanical garden outside.

Highlights include the Whale Room, which features the large skeleton of a sperm whale which washed up on Oman’s shores in the 1980s. Natural History Museum of Oman was opened on 30 December 1985,  . The Museum shows the Omani environment diversity through offers of terrain, geology, plants, insects, wild animals and marine life. Despite the small size of the Museum but abounding of facts dealing with biodiversity of the Sultanate of Oman. The Museum features stuffed animals rarely found in the wilds of types and species living in the land of Oman, skeletons of marine organisms, birds and reptiles lived in Omani environment.
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Wadi Bani Kharus

Wadi Bani Kharus has been a center of civilization and agricultural advancement in Oman for more than hundreds of years. The high mountains on both sides of the Wadi are composed of limestone formations that range from 90 million years old at the entrance of the Wadi to 600 million years in the distant parts of the Wadi

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Wadi Kitnah

A canyoning haven

Cut into the stone, this wadi is a chain of water pools and submerged caves that make it a canyoning haven. Those that prefer a more leisurely hike, can follow the wadi’s edge to or from Kitnah village.

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muscat alternative

Day 8

Muscat

Back in Muscat, this is the perfect opportunity to visit the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque before catching a flight to Salalah, in Oman’s southernmost governorate of Dhofar. Built as a present from His Majesty Sultan Qaboos bin Said to the people of Oman, the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque is an architectural masterpiece. Non-Muslims are welcome from Saturday to Thursday from 8am until 11am.

Yiti Beach

Frequented by locals as well as tourists

The Yiti Beach, located beyond the village of Yiti, is a small beach - about one kilometre long - that can be easily reached by car. Frequented by locals as well as tourists, it is a great spot to enjoy barbecues, camping, and fishing.

Jagged rocks formed by sea salt winds and waves stick out of the Sea of Oman creating the sheltered bay of Yiti Beach. Just 28-kilometres from the centre of Muscat, the beach is known as a place of solitude and relaxation – an escape from the hectic city. The sand takes on an orange hue and the water changes to a deeper blue as the sun sets and the light changes. Lay on the rocks overlooking the beach at twilight or find an area along the strip of soft sand.
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Majlis Al Jinn Cave

requires special permission to visit

One of the largest underground caves in the world, Majlis Al Jinn is a natural wonder located on the Salmah Plateau. In 2007, Austrian sky diver Felix Baumgartner based jumped into the cave, a distance of about 120 metres. Exploring this cave requires a special permission from the Ministry of Tourism Oman.

Majlis al Jinn is one of the largest cave chamber in the world by surface area. The base of the cave is58,000 square meter. The only way to get in is through one of three tiny openings at the top, all of which have been formed over time as the accumulation of rainwater dissolved the limestone covering. This cave chamber, located 60 miles from Muscat, was discovered by Americans Don Davidson Jr. and his wife Cheryl Jones in 1983. They noticed the strange holes in the ground on aerial photographs, and eventually made the journey out via helicopter. When they looked down into the small openings, they saw the sandy floor below - over 500 feet down. Just days later, they rappelled down for the first time. In an attempt to find an appropriate name for the chamber, they asked the Omanis in the surrounding area if they had a local name for it, to which the response was no. They did, however, mention that they believed that the cave was filled with genies, which are prevalent in Omani mythology. In Arabic, the word for “genie” is “al-Jinn”, so hence, the American explorers named the cave is “Majlis al Jinn. “Majlis” means “meeting place,” making the cave name, “the meeting place of the genies.”
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Quriyat

a favourite with bird watchers

The fishing village of Quriyat, en route to Sur, is a favourite with bird watchers. Species such as Kingfishers and Grey Herons are known to frequent the surrounding lagoons.

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Wadi Al Khoud

great for off-roading

Located close to the old village of Al Khoud, Wadi Al Khoud is great for off-roading, with its stony bed and small water pools. It leads to the village of Fanja.

“Wadi Al Khoudh” is located  in Wilayat Al Seeb, and is considered one of the largest wadi basins in the Sultanate. Pools are formed in the wadi following heavy rain. It is well worth a visit, to enjoy the green salience, the beautiful rock formations surrounding and its clear water pools and springs of water of the valley
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SALALAH

Day 9 – 12

Salalah and Surroundings

Best visited during the Khareef (Monsoon) season, Salalah’s rich cultural heritage dates back centuries – when the region was one of the most important trading points for Frankincense and other goods. Held to celebrate the monsoon season, Salalah’s Khareef Festival (also known as the Salalah Tourism Festival) is held annually from around mid-July until the end of August. The festival offers cultural, arts, sports and shopping activities for all. A day trip east of Salalah can include attractions such as the coastal village of Mirbat, the nearby Anti-Gravity Point and a photostop at the Jebel Samhan Plateau. The drive up the mountain can be combined with a visit of Wadi Darbat and Tawi Ateer Sinkhole. The traditional round huts of the Jeballi people are of special interest. Worth another day trip, the attractions west of Salalah include Mughsayl Beach and its blowholes plus Wadi Dawkah Reserve, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that spans over five square kilometres area, densely populated with Boswellia sacra – or Frankincense trees.

Razat Spring

a preferred picnic spot

Razat Spring is especially rich in vegetation and water, making it a preferred picnic spot throughout the year.

Salalah: The Dhofar Governorate has a collection of natural springs some of which are perennial while others are seasonal and come into action during the monsoon season. The one such spring that is popular with visitors to Salalah throughout the year is Ain Razat. It is one of the main sources of water in Salalah today. Ain Razat continues its prominent role providing water for farms . The white and magenta water lilies add to the serenity of the ambience. Another attraction of Ain Razat is its cave which would have been very difficult to have an access to during the monsoon as the ground becomes slippery, but the Dhofar Municipality has built steps to the cave. Once there one can enjoy the view of Ain Razat’s surroundings.
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Village of Sayq
Although it was formerly one of the difficult places that has access problems in Oman, the village of Sayq is one of the agricultural wonders in the Sultanate of Oman, which contains orchards full of fruits, it also provides its visitors an interesting view of the nearby wadis, and is the perfect place for camping or accommodation in one of the fancy hotels.
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Falaj Daris and Al Khataman

A UNESCO World Heritage Site

Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006, these aflaj - irrigations systems – were constructed as far back as 500 AD and are still in use today. Both falaj use gravity to irrigate the surrounding fields with water from underground springs.

The Falaj Daris is the biggest falaj in Oman, and one of the five collectively listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2006. Nizwa’s former prosperity was due to its plethora of water supplies, with over 134 aflaj (plural for falaj) in the Nizwa wilayat (village). One hundred of these are still in use today.
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Oman Natural History Museum

Located at the Ministry of Heritage and Culture

The Oman Natural History Museum provides a fascinating insight into the geological heritage of the Sultanate and its impressive flora and fauna, with displays of mammals, insects and birds as well as a beautiful botanical garden outside.

Highlights include the Whale Room, which features the large skeleton of a sperm whale which washed up on Oman’s shores in the 1980s. Natural History Museum of Oman was opened on 30 December 1985,  . The Museum shows the Omani environment diversity through offers of terrain, geology, plants, insects, wild animals and marine life. Despite the small size of the Museum but abounding of facts dealing with biodiversity of the Sultanate of Oman. The Museum features stuffed animals rarely found in the wilds of types and species living in the land of Oman, skeletons of marine organisms, birds and reptiles lived in Omani environment.
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  • 1 Day
  • 3 Days
  • 7 Days
  • 12 Days
  • - 1 Day

    1 Day

    One day may not feel long to experience everything Oman has to offer but with some careful planning and clever selections you can certainly make the most of every minute.

  • - 3 Days

    3 Days

    Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

  • - 7 Days

    7 Days

    If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

  • - 12 Days

    12 Days

    A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.