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12 Day Adventure Trip

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A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.

Day 1

Muscat

Exploring the capital of Oman, Muscat, is the perfect starting point for any adventure in Oman. Begin the day hiking the Riyam Walk, which is a trek that crosses the mountains surrounding Old Muscat. While it normally takes two hours, you can take a detour and find a small abandoned village along the way. The Riyam Walk ends at Muttrah, so why not enjoy a walk along the corniche to visit Muttrah Souq. The afternoon can be spent watching dolphins frolic in the sea, followed by a beautiful Dhow cruise at sunset starting from Marina Bandar Al Rowdah or Al Mouj Muscat.

Royal Opera House Muscat

A beautiful example of modern Omani architecture

The Royal Opera House Muscat hosts world-class shows and brings artists from around the world to Oman, including ballet, operas, musicals and more. Luxury shopping and fine dining is available at the Opera Galleria next door.

Royal Opera House Muscat is the leading arts and culture organization in the Sultanate of Oman.The vision of the Opera House is to serve as a centre of excellence in global cultural engagement. We strive to enrich lives through diverse artistic, cultural, and educational programs. The multidisciplinary work of Royal Opera House Muscat showcases rich and diverse artistic creations from Oman, the region, and the world; provides a space for culture and socioeconomic development reflections and actions; inspires audiences and nurtures creativity with innovative programs; fosters cultural vitality and unleashes talent; promotes cultural tourism; and puts cultural diplomacy into practice by reinvigorating global and multi-disciplinary collaborations and exchanges.
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Al Ansab Wetlands

a protected area

Set in the middle of Muscat, the Al Ansab Wetlands are a protected area and an ornithologists dream. Over 293 species of birds stop over at different times throughout the year, with over 80 resident species.

Muscat: Colours and fragrance fill the air at Al Ansab Wetland where winter sees the best of plants and trees bloom. The wetland has 113 species of Omani trees and shrubs. “The wetland has been there since mid- to late 80s but it was not the way it is now. At that time, may be it was used for treating purposes. Since 2011, The company ( Haya ) started focusing more on it and made a lot of changes. It is now all treated water and therefore you do not have any smell in the wetland areas. “With the addition of shrubs and trees, the area of wetland is attracting more birds. Initially, 150 bird species were reported. Now, it is more than 300.” The wetland has five lagoons, the biggest of which has a depth of four metres. The water, besides attracting birds, also supports greenery. Most of the trees and shrubs are naturally grown. But Haya Water team planted 300 trees to create a forest area, which have all grown and today provide extended shade. In the process, there have been other trees that have sprouted naturally such as banyan trees and date palms. A little further away, adjacent to the nursery of the wetland, the team planted more trees.
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Majlis Al Jinn Cave

requires special permission to visit

One of the largest underground caves in the world, Majlis Al Jinn is a natural wonder located on the Salmah Plateau. In 2007, Austrian sky diver Felix Baumgartner based jumped into the cave, a distance of about 120 metres. Exploring this cave requires a special permission from the Ministry of Tourism Oman.

Majlis al Jinn is one of the largest cave chamber in the world by surface area. The base of the cave is58,000 square meter. The only way to get in is through one of three tiny openings at the top, all of which have been formed over time as the accumulation of rainwater dissolved the limestone covering. This cave chamber, located 60 miles from Muscat, was discovered by Americans Don Davidson Jr. and his wife Cheryl Jones in 1983. They noticed the strange holes in the ground on aerial photographs, and eventually made the journey out via helicopter. When they looked down into the small openings, they saw the sandy floor below - over 500 feet down. Just days later, they rappelled down for the first time. In an attempt to find an appropriate name for the chamber, they asked the Omanis in the surrounding area if they had a local name for it, to which the response was no. They did, however, mention that they believed that the cave was filled with genies, which are prevalent in Omani mythology. In Arabic, the word for “genie” is “al-Jinn”, so hence, the American explorers named the cave is “Majlis al Jinn. “Majlis” means “meeting place,” making the cave name, “the meeting place of the genies.”
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Camping – Fins

a coastal village

Only a short drive from Bimmah Sinkhole, Fins is a coastal village mainly known for its hidden beaches and coves framed by white sands, turquoise waters and the Al Hajar Mountains as backdrop. Perfect for a memorable camping experience.

It’s legal to wild camp in Oman. And, done responsibly, it’s one of the most rewarding ways to take in the country’s varied terrain.
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Day 2

Daymaniyat Islands

The Daymaniyat Islands are located about one hour offshore from Muscat and are a great place for unforgettable underwater adventures. Comprising of 19 islands, the Damaniyat Islands is a nature reserve with restricted access, with the actual islands off bounds from May until end October. The surrounding waters, however, can be explored throughout the year and offer unforgettable diving and snorkelling opportunities.

Oil and Gas Exhibition Centre

Learn about the oil and gas industry

The Oman Oil and Gas Exhibition Centre highlights the journey of the discovery, extraction, and use of fossil fuels in Oman through interactive displays.

Established in 1995 under Petroleum Development Oman (PDO), the centre particularly appeals to visitors interested in learning about the oil and gas industry and how it has contributed to the growth of infrastructure throughout Oman.

The PDO planetarium lies adjacent to the centre and boasts a “full dome” digital system to teach kids and adults about astronomy in an engaging way.

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Camping – Fins

a coastal village

Only a short drive from Bimmah Sinkhole, Fins is a coastal village mainly known for its hidden beaches and coves framed by white sands, turquoise waters and the Al Hajar Mountains as backdrop. Perfect for a memorable camping experience.

It’s legal to wild camp in Oman. And, done responsibly, it’s one of the most rewarding ways to take in the country’s varied terrain.
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Seeb Souq

a sprawling market

Located along the coastal road in Seeb, this souq is a sprawling market selling anything from stunning traditional jewellery and luxurious perfume oils, to livestock and locally grown fruits.

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Amouage Factory

Amouage is a world-renowned luxury fragrance brand

Founded over a quarter of a century ago, Amouage is a world-renowned luxury fragrance brand with origins in the Sultanate. In the Amouage Factory, visitors can get behind the scenes and garner an insight into the creation of some of the world’s most exclusive scents.

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Day 3

Jebel Shams

Oman’s highest mountains awaits with its very own ‘Grand Canyon’ and views that turn any photo into a masterpiece. A 4WD vehicle is required. A good place to start is the Rim Walk, an easy hike along the mountain’s rim, high above Wadi Ghul, to the abandoned village of As Sab. Goats still wander the area, often resting near the ruins of the village and its old terrace fields. After a quick photo stop to take in the Grand Canyon panorama, Misfat Al Abryeen awaits upon your descent. With terrace fields and mudbrick buildings, this mountain village just begs to be explored. The final stop for the day is Al Hoota Cave, where an underground lake with blind fish and amazing stalactites and stalagmites formations make the complex a must-see when in the area.

Dolphin Watching

teeming with marine life

Muscat’s coastline is teeming with marine life, including numerous dolphin pods. Dolphin watching trips can be organized by local tour operators.

Alongwith exploring dophins you have the chance to view the scenic beauty of Oman's coastline over the prestine waters of Oman's capital area and experiance the breaktaking views of some of it's landmarks. The most commonly encountered species off Muscat are spinner dolphins, which delight the viewer with their spinning leaps. The Spinners are often joined by long-nosed common dolphins, in mixed groups. Also encountered off Muscat, but on a less regular basis are Bryde's Whales, Humpback Whales, Risso's Dolphins, Bottlenose Dolphins, False Killer Whale and the occasional Killer Whale group amongst others.
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Ubar – Lost City

a fabled lost city

This fabled lost city, also known as the Atlantis of the Sands, is tucked away in the Rub Al Khali (Empty Quarter) and rumoured to have been found near the oasis of Shisr. Ubar once played a vital role as frankincense trade hub and was mentioned in “A Thousand and One Nights” collection of Middle Eastern and South Asian stories and folk tales.

In February 1992, the New York Times announced a major archaeological discovery in the following terms: “Guided by ancient maps and sharp-eyed surveys from space, archaeologists and explorers have discovered a lost city deep in the sands of Arabia, and they are virtually sure it is Ubar, the fabled entrepôt of the rich frankincense trade thousands of years ago.”
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Kubaikib Archaeological Tombs

Visitors are able to find Kubaikib Archaeological Tombs - Kubaikib Towers in the local language - near the village of Qiran over the Selma Plateau, which are archaeological tombs, shaped like beehive, dating back to the Bronze Age nearly 4000 years ago, and were discovered in the 1990s and are considered older than the Egyptian pyramids.

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Masirah Island

Oman’s largest island

It can only be reached by ferry from Shannah and is a bird watcher's paradise as well as an important hatching site for a vast number of migrating sea turtles. It is also a great place to enjoy fishing, as well as many water sports such as kitesurfing and sailing due to the winds close to the shore.

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Day 4

Al Jebel Al Akhdar

Jebel Al Akhdar offers spectacular views along its many hiking paths. Roses, pomegranates and other crops thrive in the moderate temperatures here. A 4WD vehicle is required. The most popular trek is the village walk, which crosses several mountain villages and their surrounding terrace fields – all the time offering amazing views of the mountain. Many hotels in the area offer a variety of climbing or hiking options, but one of the most unique is the Via Ferrata available through the Alila Jebel Akhdar Resort and Spa.

Snorkelling

a memorable experience

Thanks to its clear waters teeming with exotic marine life and coral formations, snorkelling in Musandam is always a memorable experience. Lima Rock is especially renowned for the variety of fish, rays and other creatures, as well as the many caves and fissures available to explore.

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Dibba

a relaxing getaway

The small town of Dibba is home to some of the nicest hotels and beaches in Musandam, providing a relaxing getaway from the city.

Dibba Al-Baya (Arabic: دبا البيعة, Dibba Al-Baya) is a small border town in the southeastern corner of Oman's Musandam Peninsula exclave.  About 5,000 people live in this Omani town.
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Village of Lima

famous for its local handicrafts

Surrounded by mountains and accessible by boat, the village of Lima is famous for its local handicrafts - especially the Al Jarz, a small traditional axe. The boat trip itself will take you through stunning marine vistas where you can see unique rock formations.

This is a small village separated from Wilayt Khasab in Musandam Governorate by rugged mountainous peaks. That’s why the best way to reach this village is by boats that will take you through marine vistas that will be engraved in your memory for ever. There visitors will enjoy the fantastic rock formations of the mountain range directly overlooking the sea, and birds hovering over the sapphire waters through the distance that separates Khasab from Lima. The village is known for its local crafts specially the unique AlJarz.
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Khasab Castle

Home to the best ethnographic museums in Oman

Originally built by the Portuguese in the 17th century around a pre-existing circular tower, this well-preserved fort is home to one of the best ethnographic museums in Oman and the Bait Al Qufl, the ‘house of locks’, in the courtyard which was built by an Omani master craftsman.

Khasab Castle was used by the Omanis as a military base to combat the Portugese and later simultaneously as a residence of the Wali of Khasab and as a city prison. The current castle features a cylindrical central tower in the center and a square-shaped outer wall. The current castle compound features an exhibition about the history of Musandam, a model of a traditional elevated summer house, a model of a date storage (Bait Al Quful), an old documents exhibition, and many rooms displaying jewellery, clothes, weapons, kitchen equipment, wedding decorations, and a Quran learning school.
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Day 5

A’Sharqiyah Sands

Just under a three-hour drive from Al Jebel Al Akhdar, the Sharqiyah Sands are a unique eco system with it a wide range of exciting activities for all. The desert awaits! A 4WD vehicle is required. Bedouins in the area continue to breed camels for races, beauty competitions and the favourite of all desert activities – camel riding. Excursions from short walks to longer treks can be arranged through your travel agent or directly at one of the desert camps in the area. Prior to your visit, you should choose from a wide range of desert activities such as dune driving or quad biking. Visitors are asked to take extra precaution for their own safety and that of their surroundings and it is advised that visitors sit back and relax as a professional driver takes the lead while scaling and descending the dunes. Full safety equipment must be worn while using the quad bikes. After such a busy day, there is nothing like relaxing by seeing the night sky in the desert. Visitors can either book one of the existing desert camps or camp independently.

Sharqiyah Sands

experience the desert first hand

The Sharqiyah Sands allows visitors to experience the desert first hand, with dunes reaching as far as the horizon and the area teeming with wildlife. Dune bashing is one of the many favourite activities for visitors to the Sharqiyah Sands.

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Wadi Shab

A famous waterfall and crystal clear water pools,

Located just off the Sur-Muscat coastal road, Wadi Shab can be reached via a short boat ride. A short hike will bring visitors to the wadi’s famous waterfall and crystal clear water pools, and even a partially submerged cave.

Visiting Wadi Shab is one of the top things to do in Oman and you need to include it on your list. Think a fantastic gorge, warm blue pools, and a hidden waterfall!
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Ibra

A modern city

Once a trading hub at the gates to the Sharqiyah Sands, Ibra today is a modern city complete with university, hospital and hotels. Its many forts and mosques are some of the oldest in Oman, with Al Minzifah and the Wednesday Women’s Market just some of the must-see highlights.

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Sinaw Camel Market

A bustling souq

Fridays is camel market at Sinaw Souq, located at the edge of the Sharqiyah Sands and just a two hour drive from Muscat. This bustling souq is mainly visited by Bedouins, who come from the entire region to buy and sell live stock and everyday items.

Sinaw Thursday Market is held every Thursday in A’Sharqiyah North Governorate. It is a very busy market due to its proximity to the Bedouin communities, who head there to buy staples and sell their livestock and handicrafts. This market runs from six in the morning until one in the afternoon.
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Day 6 – 7

A’Sharqiyah Sands

Desert crossing by 4WD vehicle can easily be arranged with a travel agent or local tour operator and should be undertaken by a convoy of properly equipped vehicles. Having an experienced guide is always recommended. A two day, one-night desert crossing is a breath-taking experience. Not only does it provide a unique insight into the Bedouin lifestyle, it also presents the opportunity to enjoy the stunning desert landscape and camp under the stars. The trip usually ends near the ocean, close to Al Ashkhara.

Telegraph Island

a favourite with tourists

Named after a telegraph station built on the island by the British in the 19th century, Telegraph Island is a favourite with tourists looking to explore the ancient abandoned ruins, snorkel in the surrounding waters or simply enjoy a Dhow cruise to the island to witness the stunning fjords of Khawr Ash Sham.

The expression “going around the bend” is not just an idle phrase. For a handful of British soldiers in the mid-1800s, being stationed “around the bend” was the worst place you could possibly be, a lonely island outpost where soldiers slowly lost their minds in the desert heat. From 1864 to 1869, Jazirat al Maqlab, or “Telegraph Island,” was an active telegraph outpost crucial to communication between India and Britain. For five years after the telegraphy was decommissioned, British soldiers continued to man the isolated outpost. Reportedly, every single man stationed at the outpost “around the bend” of the Musandam peninsula completely lost his mind from the monotony and heat. Stuck for months on the football-field sized island, cut off from the outside world, and subject to intense desert heat, the solders were slowly driven mad. Today the island is a ghostly remnant of the once-great British Empire. The outpost was abandoned in the mid-1870s, and the buildings have crumbled. The island now serves as a snorkeling and fishing destination rather than a strategic communication hub, but the oppressive heat and the lonely atmosphere that helped drive the soldiers “around the bend” remains.
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Village of Lima

famous for its local handicrafts

Surrounded by mountains and accessible by boat, the village of Lima is famous for its local handicrafts - especially the Al Jarz, a small traditional axe. The boat trip itself will take you through stunning marine vistas where you can see unique rock formations.

This is a small village separated from Wilayt Khasab in Musandam Governorate by rugged mountainous peaks. That’s why the best way to reach this village is by boats that will take you through marine vistas that will be engraved in your memory for ever. There visitors will enjoy the fantastic rock formations of the mountain range directly overlooking the sea, and birds hovering over the sapphire waters through the distance that separates Khasab from Lima. The village is known for its local crafts specially the unique AlJarz.
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Al Ashkharah

The spectacular sandy beaches surround Al Ashkharah on both sides and extend for several kilometers, it is embraced by Arabian Sea, and there are many umbrellas on the beach that allow tourists to enjoy seeing the beauty of the beach and its golden sands, it is also a place for flocks of Gull and wader.

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Snorkelling

a memorable experience

Thanks to its clear waters teeming with exotic marine life and coral formations, snorkelling in Musandam is always a memorable experience. Lima Rock is especially renowned for the variety of fish, rays and other creatures, as well as the many caves and fissures available to explore.

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Day 8 – 10

Masirah Island

Located just a two-hour drive away from Al Ashkhara is the port of Shannah – the gateway to Masirah Island. The island itself is a great place to visit for thrill seekers and nature lovers alike. There are plenty of beaches between Al Ashkhara and Shannah to enjoy shore line fishing and during the summer months, Masirah Island enjoys moderate temperatures and consistent winds. That, together with its shallow waters, makes it perfect for kite surfing. A well-known secret in the community, kite surfers from the around the world flock here every summer. Masirah Island’s beaches are also the nesting ground for many sea turtles, including the gigantic loggerhead turtles. While visitors are welcome to witness this miracle, extra caution is advised not to disturb the animals and use special flash lights only. Jebel Humr is Masirah Island’s highest mountain and although the ascent is not too demanding, caution must be taken as the fossilised coral found along the way break easily. That’s right, all these peaks were once on the bottom of the ocean!

Jalan Bani Bu Ali

A town steeped in history with old watchtowers

Jalan Bani Bu Ali is a town steeped in history with old watchtowers, an old fort and ornate carved wooden doors at every turn. However, it is most famous for the souq, which is open every Friday morning and sells a variety of modern and traditional goods.

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Jalan Bani Bu Hassan

A must-visit when in Ash Sharqiyah

In the past Jalan Bani Bu Ali and Bani Bu Hassan were neighbouring rivals, today both settlements flow into each other amongst the date palm plantations. Jalan Bani Bu Hassan Fort is one of the oldest in the region and a must-visit when in Ash Sharqiyah.

Jalan Bani Bu Hassan, a wilayat in the Sharqiyah South Governorate, is located 300 kilometres away from Muscat. It borders Al Kamil W’al Wafi in the north, Sur in the northeast, Bidiya in the west, Mahout in the southwest and Jaalan Bani Bu Ali in the south. The wilayat comprises 197 villages that are reputed for geographical diversification and several of archaeological, historical, tourist and economic landmarks.
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Sharqiyah Sands

experience the desert first hand

The Sharqiyah Sands allows visitors to experience the desert first hand, with dunes reaching as far as the horizon and the area teeming with wildlife. Dune bashing is one of the many favourite activities for visitors to the Sharqiyah Sands.

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Wadi Tiwi

best explored on foot

Not far from Wadi Shab is Wadi Tiwi, which is lined by small villages and date and banana plantations. Although the wadi can be accessed by car, it is best explored on foot, with a two-day hike possible across the mountains to Wadi Bani Khalid.

A couple of kilometres south of Wadi Shab lies the almost identical Wadi Tiwi, another spectacularly deep and narrow gorge carved out of the mountains, running between towering cliffs right down to the sea. It’s less unspoiled than Wadi Shab surrounded by lush plantations of date and banana, and criss-crossed with a network of gurgling aflaj.
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Day 11

Tiwi

Reachable via the coastal highway, the blue waters and white pebble beach outside of the village of Tiwi are the perfect camping spot. The roads close to Wadi Tiwi are twisty and narrow – the perfect excuse to park the car and explore the area by bike. Villages along the route are surrounded by date palms and still use the falaj, a traditional method of irrigation. Close to Wadi Tiwi is Wadi Shab, which can only be reached by boat or by wading across during low tide. Natural water pools, a waterfall and hidden cave await those that hike into the wadi.

Wadi Bani Habib
One of the famous wadis in Al Jebel Al Akhdar, this Wadi can be explored on foot. It is surrounded on all sides with green walnut groves and some local bushes widely scattered. It also the home to the abandoned village of Bani Habib, which welcomes visitors who are trekking and exploration lovers.
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Jebel Qatar

The Hanging Gardens

This unique mountain is situated between Al-Ain and Al Buraimi and is known as the 'Hanging Gardens' due to the lush greenery found at intervals on the cliff side.

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Ibra

A modern city

Once a trading hub at the gates to the Sharqiyah Sands, Ibra today is a modern city complete with university, hospital and hotels. Its many forts and mosques are some of the oldest in Oman, with Al Minzifah and the Wednesday Women’s Market just some of the must-see highlights.

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Qalhat – Bibi Maryam Tomb

Explore the ruins

Once the first capital of Oman, Qalhat’s history traces back to the Bronze Age. The Portuguese occupied the city until being expelled in the late 16th century. Since then, the settlement has slowly fallen to ruin, with only the tomb of Bibi Maryam remaining as testament to Qalhat’s former importance.

Qalhat was once a shining jewel along the Omani coastline. The Indian Ocean trade route brought many people through the ancient city, which Italian explorer Marco Polo described as having “fine bazaars and one of the most beautiful mosques.” Today, a single mausoleum is all that bears witness to the city’s former glory. Some say the lonely tomb was built by Baha al-Din Ayaz, king of the Hormuz Empire, for his wife, Bibi Maryam. But others maintain that it was indeed her who built it for him.
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Day 12

As Sifah

About 150km north of Tiwi and closer to Muscat, you will find the beautiful sandy beaches of As Sifah. A perfect place to end a great journey. En-route to As Sifah, you’ll find Wadi Mayh which can easily be crossed by 4WD vehicle, but it is the many unique geological formations that visitors should try and spot. Signs along the road point out special sights. Oman has several world-class golf courses, and Jebel Sifah runs one of them. If you have never tried golfing with a view and feel like stopping off for a while, now is the perfect chance. Once back in Muscat, why not visit the Muttrah Souq. This too can be an adventure, especially when hunting for the perfect souvenir. Muttrah Souq is one of the oldest on the Arabian Peninsula and its narrow alleyways and Frankincense-laden smell invites exploration.

Ain Al Kasfa – Al Rustaq

said to have therapeutic qualities

Located at the heart of Al Rustaq, Ain Al Kasfa is a hot spring said to have therapeutic qualities. Purpose-built bathing rooms are available close by for visitors to use, as swimming in the spring itself is not allowed.

Al Rustaq is famous for two impressive and historically important landmarks: Al Hazm Castle (حصن الحزم) and the imposing Al Rustaq Fort (قـلعة الرستاق). Al Hazm Castle is at the outskirts of Al Rustaq and is one of the most famous castles in the Sultanate. The castle was built by Imam Sultan bin Saif II in the early 18th century, who is buried in this castle along with his son.  Al Hazm Castle features a massive beautiful wooden door with intricate writing and it is unique among other Omani castles for having its roof held by columns instead of the traditional wooden roof supports. The massive Al Rustaq Fort, a much older fort dating back to the 13th century, is near the city market and be can be seen from the surrounding hills. The fort is cradled by four tall towers, the tallest being more than 18 meters tall. The fort also has its own falaj water system within it. Both Al Rustaq Fort and Al Hazm Castle are included in the Tentative List to be nominated for the UNESCO World Heritage List. Unfortunately, they were both also closed for renovations during our visit (with typically no foreseen re-opening dates!), but if you climb up the mountain overlooking Rustaq you can see amazing views of the city and Al Rustaq Fort as it is clearly the most dominant feature of the landscape.
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Wadi Dayqah Dam

An amazing picnic area

Wadi Dayqah Dam is one of the largest on the Arabian Peninsula and a source of irrigation and protection for the surrounding villages, as it reduces the number of flash floods in the area. A picnic area has been built atop the dam with great views for all to enjoy.

Wadi Dayqah Dam is quite a spectacular sight! Set in the rugged limestone Wadi (valley) this huge construction is a real contrast of natural Omani beauty and impressive human engineering. Opened in 2012 the dam was built to collect the periodic rain fall from the high peaks above and control the volume of water flowing through the narrow torrent, ‘dayqah’, to the villages below. This still maintains the ancient “Falaj” irrigation system whilst controlling the surges of water rolling off the hillside. The dam is quite a spectacle for Oman and is by far the highest in the country. The water lake is 8 kilometres (5 miles) long and can hold 100 million cubic meters of rain water.
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Qalhat – Bibi Maryam Tomb

Explore the ruins

Once the first capital of Oman, Qalhat’s history traces back to the Bronze Age. The Portuguese occupied the city until being expelled in the late 16th century. Since then, the settlement has slowly fallen to ruin, with only the tomb of Bibi Maryam remaining as testament to Qalhat’s former importance.

Qalhat was once a shining jewel along the Omani coastline. The Indian Ocean trade route brought many people through the ancient city, which Italian explorer Marco Polo described as having “fine bazaars and one of the most beautiful mosques.” Today, a single mausoleum is all that bears witness to the city’s former glory. Some say the lonely tomb was built by Baha al-Din Ayaz, king of the Hormuz Empire, for his wife, Bibi Maryam. But others maintain that it was indeed her who built it for him.
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Wadi Sharm

A small oasis

Located in a fertile valley, Wadi Sharm small oasis has its own falaj system for irrigation making its way through the date palm plantation and an unrestored fort. Visitors are welcome to explore the wadi and its villages on foot.

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  • 1 Day
  • 3 Days
  • 7 Days
  • 12 Days
  • - 1 Day

    1 Day

    One day may not feel long to experience everything Oman has to offer but with some careful planning and clever selections you can certainly make the most of every minute.

  • - 3 Days

    3 Days

    Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

  • - 7 Days

    7 Days

    If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

  • - 12 Days

    12 Days

    A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.