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12 Day Adventure Trip

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A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.

Day 1

Muscat

Exploring the capital of Oman, Muscat, is the perfect starting point for any adventure in Oman. Begin the day hiking the Riyam Walk, which is a trek that crosses the mountains surrounding Old Muscat. While it normally takes two hours, you can take a detour and find a small abandoned village along the way. The Riyam Walk ends at Muttrah, so why not enjoy a walk along the corniche to visit Muttrah Souq. The afternoon can be spent watching dolphins frolic in the sea, followed by a beautiful Dhow cruise at sunset starting from Marina Bandar Al Rowdah or Al Mouj Muscat.

Camping – Fins

a coastal village

Only a short drive from Bimmah Sinkhole, Fins is a coastal village mainly known for its hidden beaches and coves framed by white sands, turquoise waters and the Al Hajar Mountains as backdrop. Perfect for a memorable camping experience.

It’s legal to wild camp in Oman. And, done responsibly, it’s one of the most rewarding ways to take in the country’s varied terrain.
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Majlis Al Jinn Cave

requires special permission to visit

One of the largest underground caves in the world, Majlis Al Jinn is a natural wonder located on the Salmah Plateau. In 2007, Austrian sky diver Felix Baumgartner based jumped into the cave, a distance of about 120 metres. Exploring this cave requires a special permission from the Ministry of Tourism Oman.

Majlis al Jinn is one of the largest cave chamber in the world by surface area. The base of the cave is58,000 square meter. The only way to get in is through one of three tiny openings at the top, all of which have been formed over time as the accumulation of rainwater dissolved the limestone covering. This cave chamber, located 60 miles from Muscat, was discovered by Americans Don Davidson Jr. and his wife Cheryl Jones in 1983. They noticed the strange holes in the ground on aerial photographs, and eventually made the journey out via helicopter. When they looked down into the small openings, they saw the sandy floor below - over 500 feet down. Just days later, they rappelled down for the first time. In an attempt to find an appropriate name for the chamber, they asked the Omanis in the surrounding area if they had a local name for it, to which the response was no. They did, however, mention that they believed that the cave was filled with genies, which are prevalent in Omani mythology. In Arabic, the word for “genie” is “al-Jinn”, so hence, the American explorers named the cave is “Majlis al Jinn. “Majlis” means “meeting place,” making the cave name, “the meeting place of the genies.”
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Amouage Factory

Amouage is a world-renowned luxury fragrance brand

Founded over a quarter of a century ago, Amouage is a world-renowned luxury fragrance brand with origins in the Sultanate. In the Amouage Factory, visitors can get behind the scenes and garner an insight into the creation of some of the world’s most exclusive scents.

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Wadi Al Arbeieen

most beautiful wadis in the Sultanate

Wadi Al Arbeieen is one of the most beautiful wadis in the Sultanate, experiencing a constant flow of water from the eastern Hajar mountains and providing a source of irrigation to the surrounding villages and date palm farms.

Wadi Al Arbaeen provides the ultimate soundtrack of nature, that refer to the sounds of running water, birds and the wind flowing through the narrow channels. You can go there to swimming, BBQ, hang out and picnic and the waterfall deep inside the wadi, reaching to there will take 2.5 exhausting hours but it is worth it to experience, It’s not every day you take a shower under a waterfall. This is an incredibly enjoyable wadi, with lots of rock-crawling and water crossing with the car. The weather is very good there, especially in winter, with the sun reaching the bottom of the canyon for a short time of the day, the temperature is noticeably, so you can get outdoors for an adventure to the fantasy.
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Day 2

Daymaniyat Islands

The Daymaniyat Islands are located about one hour offshore from Muscat and are a great place for unforgettable underwater adventures. Comprising of 19 islands, the Damaniyat Islands is a nature reserve with restricted access, with the actual islands off bounds from May until end October. The surrounding waters, however, can be explored throughout the year and offer unforgettable diving and snorkelling opportunities.

Place and People Museum

a modern art gallery

Place and People Museum is located along Muttrah’s beautiful waterfront – or corniche – and divided into three different exhibits: an old Omani house showcasing living in the Sultanate in the 1950s to 1970s, a museum highlighting Omani clothing and a modern art gallery.

Place and People Museum is an exclusive addition to the Omani cultural scene, opened in January '2011 Located near the Muttrah Fort, the museum is a dream project of Her Highness Sayyida Dr Ghalya bint Fahr bin Taimour Al Said. The Old house is a group of typical Omani houses from the period of 1950 to 1975 that tell the story of the Omanis and their deeply rooted heritage, customs and traditions. The Wedding, the Kitchen and Display Rooms, the Mother and Children’s Room, the Winter Room, the Majlis (Living Room), Musabbeh’s Room describe the earlier Omani lifestyle which still finds echoes in today’s traditions. The museum displays a subtlety combined with a sense of immediacy (to transport the visitor back in time) in showing Omani life at this period in the form of the historic contents of their homes, their art, artifacts and inventions.
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National Museum Oman

Rich in history and heritage

Opened in 2016, the National Museum of Oman is located opposite the Sultan’s Palace in Old Muscat and showcases the Sultanate’s rich history and heritage, from its earliest settlement through to present day.

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Yiti Beach

Frequented by locals as well as tourists

The Yiti Beach, located beyond the village of Yiti, is a small beach - about one kilometre long - that can be easily reached by car. Frequented by locals as well as tourists, it is a great spot to enjoy barbecues, camping, and fishing.

Jagged rocks formed by sea salt winds and waves stick out of the Sea of Oman creating the sheltered bay of Yiti Beach. Just 28-kilometres from the centre of Muscat, the beach is known as a place of solitude and relaxation – an escape from the hectic city. The sand takes on an orange hue and the water changes to a deeper blue as the sun sets and the light changes. Lay on the rocks overlooking the beach at twilight or find an area along the strip of soft sand.
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Bird Watching in Quriyat

a favourite with bird watchers

The fishing village of Quriyat, en route to Sur, is a favourite with bird watchers. Species such as kingfishers and grey herons are known to frequent the surrounding lagoons.

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Day 3

Jebel Shams

Oman’s highest mountains awaits with its very own ‘Grand Canyon’ and views that turn any photo into a masterpiece. A 4WD vehicle is required. A good place to start is the Rim Walk, an easy hike along the mountain’s rim, high above Wadi Ghul, to the abandoned village of As Sab. Goats still wander the area, often resting near the ruins of the village and its old terrace fields. After a quick photo stop to take in the Grand Canyon panorama, Misfat Al Abryeen awaits upon your descent. With terrace fields and mudbrick buildings, this mountain village just begs to be explored. The final stop for the day is Al Hoota Cave, where an underground lake with blind fish and amazing stalactites and stalagmites formations make the complex a must-see when in the area.

Wadi Tiwi

best explored on foot

Not far from Wadi Shab is Wadi Tiwi, which is lined by small villages and date and banana plantations. Although the wadi can be accessed by car, it is best explored on foot, with a two-day hike possible across the mountains to Wadi Bani Khalid.

A couple of kilometres south of Wadi Shab lies the almost identical Wadi Tiwi, another spectacularly deep and narrow gorge carved out of the mountains, running between towering cliffs right down to the sea. It’s less unspoiled than Wadi Shab surrounded by lush plantations of date and banana, and criss-crossed with a network of gurgling aflaj.
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Ibra

A modern city

Once a trading hub at the gates to the Sharqiyah Sands, Ibra today is a modern city complete with university, hospital and hotels. Its many forts and mosques are some of the oldest in Oman, with Al Minzifah and the Wednesday Women’s Market just some of the must-see highlights.

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Royal Opera House Muscat

A beautiful example of modern Omani architecture

The Royal Opera House Muscat hosts world-class shows and brings artists from around the world to Oman, including ballet, operas, musicals and more. Luxury shopping and fine dining is available at the Opera Galleria next door.

Royal Opera House Muscat is the leading arts and culture organization in the Sultanate of Oman.The vision of the Opera House is to serve as a centre of excellence in global cultural engagement. We strive to enrich lives through diverse artistic, cultural, and educational programs. The multidisciplinary work of Royal Opera House Muscat showcases rich and diverse artistic creations from Oman, the region, and the world; provides a space for culture and socioeconomic development reflections and actions; inspires audiences and nurtures creativity with innovative programs; fosters cultural vitality and unleashes talent; promotes cultural tourism; and puts cultural diplomacy into practice by reinvigorating global and multi-disciplinary collaborations and exchanges.
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Village of Lima

famous for its local handicrafts

Surrounded by mountains and accessible by boat, the village of Lima is famous for its local handicrafts - especially the Al Jarz, a small traditional axe. The boat trip itself will take you through stunning marine vistas where you can see unique rock formations.

This is a small village separated from Wilayt Khasab in Musandam Governorate by rugged mountainous peaks. That’s why the best way to reach this village is by boats that will take you through marine vistas that will be engraved in your memory for ever. There visitors will enjoy the fantastic rock formations of the mountain range directly overlooking the sea, and birds hovering over the sapphire waters through the distance that separates Khasab from Lima. The village is known for its local crafts specially the unique AlJarz.
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Day 4

Al Jebel Al Akhdar

Jebel Al Akhdar offers spectacular views along its many hiking paths. Roses, pomegranates and other crops thrive in the moderate temperatures here. A 4WD vehicle is required. The most popular trek is the village walk, which crosses several mountain villages and their surrounding terrace fields – all the time offering amazing views of the mountain. Many hotels in the area offer a variety of climbing or hiking options, but one of the most unique is the Via Ferrata available through the Alila Jebel Akhdar Resort and Spa.

Dhow Cruises

a great way to experience Musandam’s coastline

Dhow cruises are a great way to experience Musandam’s coastline in the traditional sense. Many marinas and tour operators provide dhow cruises that can include island visits, swimming, barbecues, and more.

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Jebel al Harim

A haven for biking enthusiasts

Offering spectacular views and adventurous paths, Jebel Hareem is the Musandam’s highest peak and a haven for biking enthusiasts. Local tour operators offer guided mountain biking tours.

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Village of Kumzar

requires special permission to visit

Nestled in an isolated bay close to the Strait of Hormuz, this village is only accessible by boat. Locals speak their own language known as Kumzari but, given its remote location, the village is surprisingly modern.

One of the most inaccessible settlements in Oman, the famously remote town of KUMZAR sits perched in solitary splendour at the northernmost edge of Musandam, hemmed in by sheer mountains and accessible only by boat. A “visit” to the town therefore involves sitting in your boat in the harbour about 100m offshore and seeing what you can, although it’s still well worth making the trip out here for the magnificent coastal scenery en route, as well as for the tantalizing glimpse of Oman’s most reclusive town at the end of it. Many of Musandam’s best diving spots are also located in the waters around Kumzar for more details. The town overlooks the Straits of Hormuz, one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes, a fact reflected in the unique language spoken by its inhabitants, Kumzari. The village is said to be around seven hundred years old, its inhabitants including a hotchpotch of ethnic groups ranging from Yemeni to Zanzibari – the colourful theory that sailors shipwrecked off the nearby coast were also integrated into the population is backed up by the remarkable number of European and Hindi loan words found in Kumzari. The town’s population currently stands at around five thousand, with its own school, hospital, power station and desalination plant. The inhabitants live largely by fishing for nine months of the year, netting barracuda, tuna, kingfish and hammour .
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Village of Lima

famous for its local handicrafts

Surrounded by mountains and accessible by boat, the village of Lima is famous for its local handicrafts - especially the Al Jarz, a small traditional axe. The boat trip itself will take you through stunning marine vistas where you can see unique rock formations.

This is a small village separated from Wilayt Khasab in Musandam Governorate by rugged mountainous peaks. That’s why the best way to reach this village is by boats that will take you through marine vistas that will be engraved in your memory for ever. There visitors will enjoy the fantastic rock formations of the mountain range directly overlooking the sea, and birds hovering over the sapphire waters through the distance that separates Khasab from Lima. The village is known for its local crafts specially the unique AlJarz.
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Day 5

A’Sharqiyah Sands

Just under a three-hour drive from Al Jebel Al Akhdar, the Sharqiyah Sands are a unique eco system with it a wide range of exciting activities for all. The desert awaits! A 4WD vehicle is required. Bedouins in the area continue to breed camels for races, beauty competitions and the favourite of all desert activities – camel riding. Excursions from short walks to longer treks can be arranged through your travel agent or directly at one of the desert camps in the area. Prior to your visit, you should choose from a wide range of desert activities such as dune driving or quad biking. Visitors are asked to take extra precaution for their own safety and that of their surroundings and it is advised that visitors sit back and relax as a professional driver takes the lead while scaling and descending the dunes. Full safety equipment must be worn while using the quad bikes. After such a busy day, there is nothing like relaxing by seeing the night sky in the desert. Visitors can either book one of the existing desert camps or camp independently.

Al Mudayrib Village

This traditional village is home to an old centre

Complete with aflaj (waterway) system, watch towers and mud brick buildings. The village is surrounded by date palms and its heritage souq has recently been restored.

Al Mudayrib has managed to keep its atmosphere and character. The historical center is surrounded by small hills with watchtowers which are visible from afar. Al Mudayrib is still inhabited as it always was, although here too new buildings are emerging around the old settlement. In the middle of the hollow the houses cluster around the only falaj. The oldest extant buildings in Al Mudayrib are from the 18th century. The comparatively good condition of the walls is thanks to the solid manner of construction – the stones were bound together with a mixture of clay and plaster. The large buildings equipped with defensive towers were used by the various clans as meeting points. In times of war they served as a defensive refuge for individual members of the tribe or for large families.
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Qalhat – Bibi Maryam Tomb

Explore the ruins

Once the first capital of Oman, Qalhat’s history traces back to the Bronze Age. The Portuguese occupied the city until being expelled in the late 16th century. Since then, the settlement has slowly fallen to ruin, with only the tomb of Bibi Maryam remaining as testament to Qalhat’s former importance.

Qalhat was once a shining jewel along the Omani coastline. The Indian Ocean trade route brought many people through the ancient city, which Italian explorer Marco Polo described as having “fine bazaars and one of the most beautiful mosques.” Today, a single mausoleum is all that bears witness to the city’s former glory. Some say the lonely tomb was built by Baha al-Din Ayaz, king of the Hormuz Empire, for his wife, Bibi Maryam. But others maintain that it was indeed her who built it for him.
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Ras Al Jinz

A famous nature reserve

Thousands of sea turtles migrate yearly to the shores of Oman to lay their eggs. Ras Al Jinz is a nature reserve famous for the opportunity to witness the endangered green sea turtle in its natural habitat during nesting and hatching season.

Ras Al Jinz Turtle Reserve, a unique natural landscape, unspoiled shorelines, golden deserts, luxuriant green oases and rugged mountains. Ras Al Jinz is world renown for the nesting of the endangered green turtle (Cheloniamydas), probably the most important nesting concentration on the Indian Ocean. This is the only place where public can watch the nesting process of these amazing sea-giants. A once in a lifetime opportunity.
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Jalan Bani Bu Hassan

A must-visit when in Ash Sharqiyah

In the past Jalan Bani Bu Ali and Bani Bu Hassan were neighbouring rivals, today both settlements flow into each other amongst the date palm plantations. Jalan Bani Bu Hassan Fort is one of the oldest in the region and a must-visit when in Ash Sharqiyah.

Jalan Bani Bu Hassan, a wilayat in the Sharqiyah South Governorate, is located 300 kilometres away from Muscat. It borders Al Kamil W’al Wafi in the north, Sur in the northeast, Bidiya in the west, Mahout in the southwest and Jaalan Bani Bu Ali in the south. The wilayat comprises 197 villages that are reputed for geographical diversification and several of archaeological, historical, tourist and economic landmarks.
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Day 6 – 7

A’Sharqiyah Sands

Desert crossing by 4WD vehicle can easily be arranged with a travel agent or local tour operator and should be undertaken by a convoy of properly equipped vehicles. Having an experienced guide is always recommended. A two day, one-night desert crossing is a breath-taking experience. Not only does it provide a unique insight into the Bedouin lifestyle, it also presents the opportunity to enjoy the stunning desert landscape and camp under the stars. The trip usually ends near the ocean, close to Al Ashkhara.

Barka Fort

Explore the various rooms and watch platforms

The octagonal shaped tower makes Barka Fort unlike any other fort in Oman. Visitors can explore the various rooms and watch platforms, the latter of which provide excellent views of the ocean and surrounding area.

Near the north coast of Oman, in the province of Nakhal, is a spectacular fortress that pre-dates the Islamic era. The pre-Islamic (the exact date is unknown) structure that was the foundation for later additions to Nakhal Fort was built around a large, oddly shaped boulder at the base of Mount Nakhal, which occasionally juts out into the fort’s interior. This is why the fort is an irregular shape. The fort has been renovated many times since its construction to protect nearby trade routes, most notably in the 9th and 17th centuries as well as in 1834 (when the walls, towers, and entranceway were built). There is a mosque on the first floor and residential and reception rooms on the upper level. The ceiling of one guest room features beautiful geometric designs and Arabic writing. From its history of use for defense, Nakhal Fort has acquired a collection of interesting features, including nooks over doorways where boiling cauldrons of honey or date juice would wait to be poured on invaders, and spiked doors for repelling battering rams. Today, the fort houses a museum with exhibits of historic guns and other artifacts. Every Friday at the fort there is a goat market. The view from the fort is mostly of date palm trees that fill the surrounding area, appropriate, since the fort’s name, Nakhal, translates to “palm.”
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Taqah Castle

Restored and is open to the public

Built in the 19th century, Taqah Fort is in the heart of Taqah and a good example of how people used to live in the area. The castle has been restored and is open to the public.

This small but well-preserved castle was built in the 19th century. With a furnished interior, good signage and an accompanying booklet explaining the history of this sardine-producing town, this is one of the better fort museums in Oman. The fort is located in the pretty fishing village of Taqah, which boasts a white-sand beach, a landscaped khor, a fine corniche.
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Wandering around wadis – Snake Gorge

Snake Gorge is located halfway through Wadi Bani Awf, a wadi that crosses the Al Hajar mountain range; and it was named for the many snakes.-like bends, it is a destination for many visitors who come especially for adventure. as they cross the gorge on foot, across various boulders and water pools. Given the required level of fitness, those wishing to explore it are asked to arrange a guide

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Sharqiyah Sands

experience the desert first hand

The Sharqiyah Sands allows visitors to experience the desert first hand, with dunes reaching as far as the horizon and the area teeming with wildlife. Dune bashing is one of the many favourite activities for visitors to the Sharqiyah Sands.

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Day 8 – 10

Masirah Island

Located just a two-hour drive away from Al Ashkhara is the port of Shannah – the gateway to Masirah Island. The island itself is a great place to visit for thrill seekers and nature lovers alike. There are plenty of beaches between Al Ashkhara and Shannah to enjoy shore line fishing and during the summer months, Masirah Island enjoys moderate temperatures and consistent winds. That, together with its shallow waters, makes it perfect for kite surfing. A well-known secret in the community, kite surfers from the around the world flock here every summer. Masirah Island’s beaches are also the nesting ground for many sea turtles, including the gigantic loggerhead turtles. While visitors are welcome to witness this miracle, extra caution is advised not to disturb the animals and use special flash lights only. Jebel Humr is Masirah Island’s highest mountain and although the ascent is not too demanding, caution must be taken as the fossilised coral found along the way break easily. That’s right, all these peaks were once on the bottom of the ocean!

Sur Dhow Yard

The only surviving dhow-building yard in Oman.

Close to the Sur Maritime Museum, Sur’s dhow yard is the perfect place to witness craftsman build dhows the traditional way, without plans. This is the only surviving dhow-building yard in Oman.

If there is one industrial town in Oman that has not lost its importance from the days of yore, it’s Sur. You know you’ve entered a town that prides on its traditional heritage when the maze of streets showcase ancient residential dwellings each of which still carry a mark of the past on its majestic carved doors and Arabesque windows. Long considered as Oman’s prime trading ports, the calm and serene coastal town is the capital of A’Sharqiyah on the coast of the of Oman Sea. Sur has always been the epicentre of travel and trade in this region. Its vessels have ruled the waters since many centuries! Its strategic location has always helped in maintaining and monitoring peace in the of Oman Sea and the Indian Ocean. Although it no longer retains its prominence in the trade industry, Sur continues to be the best in building wooden ships, at least in the Gulf region. A couple of centuries back this town built ships for clients in China, India, Iraq and other prominent trade destinations in the region. And although the dhow yards in Sur have reduced considerably given the fast decline in the demand for dhows since almost a century now, the charm and character of the laid-back town remains unfazed.
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Qalhat – Bibi Maryam Tomb

Explore the ruins

Once the first capital of Oman, Qalhat’s history traces back to the Bronze Age. The Portuguese occupied the city until being expelled in the late 16th century. Since then, the settlement has slowly fallen to ruin, with only the tomb of Bibi Maryam remaining as testament to Qalhat’s former importance.

Qalhat was once a shining jewel along the Omani coastline. The Indian Ocean trade route brought many people through the ancient city, which Italian explorer Marco Polo described as having “fine bazaars and one of the most beautiful mosques.” Today, a single mausoleum is all that bears witness to the city’s former glory. Some say the lonely tomb was built by Baha al-Din Ayaz, king of the Hormuz Empire, for his wife, Bibi Maryam. But others maintain that it was indeed her who built it for him.
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Al Ashkharah

The spectacular sandy beaches surround Al Ashkharah on both sides and extend for several kilometers, it is embraced by Arabian Sea, and there are many umbrellas on the beach that allow tourists to enjoy seeing the beauty of the beach and its golden sands, it is also a place for flocks of Gull and wader.

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Ibra

A modern city

Once a trading hub at the gates to the Sharqiyah Sands, Ibra today is a modern city complete with university, hospital and hotels. Its many forts and mosques are some of the oldest in Oman, with Al Minzifah and the Wednesday Women’s Market just some of the must-see highlights.

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Day 11

Tiwi

Reachable via the coastal highway, the blue waters and white pebble beach outside of the village of Tiwi are the perfect camping spot. The roads close to Wadi Tiwi are twisty and narrow – the perfect excuse to park the car and explore the area by bike. Villages along the route are surrounded by date palms and still use the falaj, a traditional method of irrigation. Close to Wadi Tiwi is Wadi Shab, which can only be reached by boat or by wading across during low tide. Natural water pools, a waterfall and hidden cave await those that hike into the wadi.

Anti-Gravity Point – Mirbat

Anti-Gravity Point

Not far from Mirbat, people from all around the world come to this Anti-Gravity Point to experience the out-of-this-world feeling of having their car seemingly move up-hill with no driver input or power.

Many people come to Salalah Anit Gravity Point to see their cars going up the hill at Neutral gear (without any acceleration). This is a really amazing experience and a unique one. The car can move at a speed of more than 40 to 60 kilometers per hour without any acceleration. This point is near Tawi Atair / Mirbat and you can visit this place while going to Mirbat. You can also plan to go to this place after visiting Wadi Darbat and driving for aproximately 20 to 30 minutes on the Eastern side.
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Al Wusta Wildlife Reserve

Home to the Arabian Oryx

Since the global extinction of the species in the wild in 1972, the Arabian Oryx has been reintroduced within a specially designated area in Oman’s Al Wusta region.

In the middle of a spectacular desert escarpment, this reserve is home to a small herd of reintroduced oryx. It offers a rare chance to see this magnificent desert antelope up close as there is a large herd of over 600 animals in the reserve's breeding centre. The reserve, access to which is by 4WD with prior permit only, is 50km off the Haima–Duqm road (Hwy 37) on a poorly graded track marked 'Habab', 110km from Haima. After 23km along the track.
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Hasik Cliffs

breath-taking limestone formations

Located two hours from Salalah, the cliffs of Hasik form part of the breath-taking limestone formations that run along most of Dhofar’s coastline – this area makes for a spectacular drive.

Positioned at the most eastern end of the Dhofar coast before the cliffs of Jebel Samhan interrupt, Hasik is worth the two-hour drive from Salalah for the journey more than the destination.
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Teeq Cave & Tawi Ateer Sinkhole

One of the world’s largest sinkholes

En route to the top of Jebel Samhan, Tawi Ateer is one of the world’s largest sinkholes. It is filled with shrubs and plants, turning it into a haven for birds which earned it the nickname “Bird Well”.  From the entrance of the nearby Teeq Cave visitors can enjoy panoramic views of the sinkhole and its waterfalls from the cave’s entrance.

“Tawi Ateer Sinkhole” is the most famous sinkhole in Dhofar governorate known as the ‘Bird Well’ gained international fame after its discovery in 1997 by a team of Slovenian explorers in collaboration with Sultan Qaboos University as one of the largest solvent sinkholes in the world. This adds to the Sultanate’s rich biodiversity, its geographical and historical richness, and its historical and archaeological sites, as well as its remains of early civilization, all of which endorses the Governorate of Dhofar as a tourist destination, and boosts the various opportunities for those interested in discovery, along with nature and adventure lovers. The capacity of the Teeq Sinkhole is about 975 thousand cubic metres. Its diameter is between 130 to 150 metres and its depth is 211 metres. Water flowing down the valleys has resulted in the formation of the sinkhole, with its magnificent waterfalls along the intersection with Teeq Sinkhole. In the surroundings of Teeq sinkhole there are several interesting structures, as round collapse dolines, walls around this sinkhole are very slope, and there are wadis enter the sinkhole as very spectacular waterfalls.
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Day 12

As Sifah

About 150km north of Tiwi and closer to Muscat, you will find the beautiful sandy beaches of As Sifah. A perfect place to end a great journey. En-route to As Sifah, you’ll find Wadi Mayh which can easily be crossed by 4WD vehicle, but it is the many unique geological formations that visitors should try and spot. Signs along the road point out special sights. Oman has several world-class golf courses, and Jebel Sifah runs one of them. If you have never tried golfing with a view and feel like stopping off for a while, now is the perfect chance. Once back in Muscat, why not visit the Muttrah Souq. This too can be an adventure, especially when hunting for the perfect souvenir. Muttrah Souq is one of the oldest on the Arabian Peninsula and its narrow alleyways and Frankincense-laden smell invites exploration.

Al Ayn and Bat Beehive Tombs

A must-see attraction

A must-see attraction in the A'Dhahirah region, the Al Ayn and Bat Beehive Tombs are not only recognised as a UNESCO World Heritage site, but also boast the title of the most complete collection of necropolises and settlements in the world, dating back to the 3rd Millennium BC.

More than 100 tombs stand defiantly on the hilltops of Northern Oman, all shaped like beehives. Little is known about the tombs, or the culture that constructed them, but they are thought to date from 3000 to 2000 B.C.E. All together they form one of the largest protohistoric necropoleis in the world. It is a bit difficult to spot the tombs at first, since they merge harmoniously with the hills they were built on, but upon closer inspection they are easily spotted. The tombs are arranged in three main clusters, the one in Bat, which is arguably the most famous, as well as the sites of al-Ayn and al-Khutm. The best preserved tombs of the site are the ones of the al-Ayn grouping.
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Muscat Gate Museum

One of the most photographed landmarks

One of the most photographed landmarks in the Sultanate, this museum is set over a road that marks the entrance into Old Muscat. Visitors can view general and historic information about Oman and enjoy stunning views of Muttrah corniche from the terrace.

Spanning the road between the old walled city of Muscat and the Corniche nestles the Muscat Gate Museum. The museum transport visitors to a different world, an enriching journey of the emergence and evolution of the Sultanate of Oman, also stands testament to Muscat’s history and artifacts. The gates of the museum formerly marked Muscat city’s boundary for the city was once enclosed within the fortified walls. The gateway was used until 1970 to keep intruders out of the walled vicinity. Though the museum houses limited exhibits, it is more popular for being an excellent vantage point offering breathtaking vistas of the Diwan and the Corniche. Once you are done exploring the historical artifacts, take a drive up to the aerial mast to the neighboring hillock to enjoy a panoramic view of the Muttrah area and the Muscat city before it merges with the horizon of the Al Riyam Park.
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Al Awabi

Nestled at the foot of the Al Hajar Mountain range

Located between Nakhal and Al Rustaq, Al Awabi is a quaint traditional-looking Omani town nestled at the foot of the Al Hajar Mountain range.

The small village of Al Awabi straddles Hwy 13, the road that links the important towns of Barka with Rustaq. With some attractive modern houses painted in pastel hues in defiance of the national 'white only' regulation, this is a typical Batinah Plain village. It boasts a fort but not very much else by way of sights, but it has an important function as the gateway to Wadi Bani Kharus.
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Bahla Fort

A UNESCO World Heritage Site

This immense mud brick fortress was the first in Oman to be listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, in 1987. Since then, it has been beautifully restored and opened to the public, allowing visitors to experience the ingenuity of the Banu Nebhan tribe.

The oasis of Bahla owes its prosperity to the Banu Nebhan, the dominant tribe in the area from the 12th to the end of the 15th century. The ruins of the immense fort, with its walls and towers of unbaked brick and its stone foundations, is a remarkable example of this type of fortification.
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  • - 1 Day

    1 Day

    One day may not feel long to experience everything Oman has to offer but with some careful planning and clever selections you can certainly make the most of every minute.

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    3 Days

    Whether an extended weekend, stopover or short city break, three days in Oman can deliver lasting memories and build anticipation for your next visit.

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    7 Days

    If you have a bit more time, why not head to Oman’s far south and explore Salalah – the gulf’s only tropical destination.

  • - 12 Days

    12 Days

    A longer trip to Oman allows you to go further, see more and do more. With 12 days, you can fully appreciate the wonders Oman has to offer from boat trips to mountain hikes, immersing yourself in the culture and creating an unforgettable experience.